Dana Dorman

Dana Dorman is a researcher for HSP's Research by Mail service. She previously served as project manager of HSP digital history projects focused on the Great Depression and the Underground Railroad, and as project archivist for the Digital Center for Americana pilot project. A Certified Archivist, Dana earned a BA in anthropology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a M.A. in public history from Temple University, where she wrote her thesis about the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies.

This Author's Posts

HSP's "New in the Library" blog has been updated with the latest set of genealogy-related titles that have been added to our collection. Click here for the latest list of additions of resource guides, family histories, and more.

11/28/12

As the Greenfield Digital Project enters its final months, I'm amazed at all we've accomplished and also trying not to think too much about all the work we have left to complete.                  

11/7/12

Following up on Sarah's post about cemetery records last month, I thought I'd highlight another helpful source for family history research: undertakers' records.

10/31/12
Comments: 2

Did you know that HSP is one of the largest family history libraries in the nation?

6/17/12
Comments: 3

I'm excited to report that we've moved on to the next phase of the Greenfield Digital Project: researching and annotating our 324 selected primary-source documents.

4/11/12

We are nearly finished with phase one of the Greenfield Digital Project -- transcribing and adding basic XML encoding to 300+ documents selected from HSP's collections to help tell the story of Bankers Trust Company, the first large bank to fail in Philadelphia during the Great Depression.

2/1/12

Given all the headlines about the struggling economy over the last couple years, it feels remarkably timely to be transcribing documents from the early months of the Great Depression as part of the Greenfield Digital Project.

Recently, I’ve been working on letters from depositors of Bankers Trust Company, which became one of the first large banks to fail in Philadelphia when it closed on December 22, 1930.

7/26/11
Comments: 1

Now that we’re elbow-deep in encoding the 300 or so documents for the Greenfield Digital Project, my colleague Faith Charlton and I are spending a lot of time at the keyboard.

6/15/11

April was a month of learning, sharing, and inspiration for me, thanks to several conferences and workshops.

First, I attended the annual meeting of the National Council on Public History (NCPH), held in Pensacola, Florida this year.

5/4/11

Over the last few months, I’ve been spending a lot of my time focused on a fairly technical topic: text encoding.

Basically, text encoding is a method for representing text in a digital form. It allows you to record information about text -- for example, whether it is handwritten, or mentions someone’s name, or is the salutation of a letter -- right alongside the text itself.

3/23/11