Dana Dorman

Dana Dorman is a project associate for the Historic Images, New Technologies project, and also a researcher for HSP's Research by Mail service. She previously served as project manager of HSP digital history projects focused on the Great Depression and the Underground Railroad, and as project archivist for the Digital Center for Americana pilot project. A Certified Archivist, Dana earned a BA in anthropology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and a M.A. in public history from Temple University, where she wrote her thesis about the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies.

This Author's Posts

We are nearly finished with phase one of the Greenfield Digital Project -- transcribing and adding basic XML encoding to 300+ documents selected from HSP's collections to help tell the story of Bankers Trust Company, the first large bank to fail in Philadelphia during the Great Depression.

2/1/12

Given all the headlines about the struggling economy over the last couple years, it feels remarkably timely to be transcribing documents from the early months of the Great Depression as part of the Greenfield Digital Project.

Recently, I’ve been working on letters from depositors of Bankers Trust Company, which became one of the first large banks to fail in Philadelphia when it closed on December 22, 1930.

7/26/11
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Now that we’re elbow-deep in encoding the 300 or so documents for the Greenfield Digital Project, my colleague Faith Charlton and I are spending a lot of time at the keyboard.

6/15/11

April was a month of learning, sharing, and inspiration for me, thanks to several conferences and workshops.

First, I attended the annual meeting of the National Council on Public History (NCPH), held in Pensacola, Florida this year.

5/4/11

Over the last few months, I’ve been spending a lot of my time focused on a fairly technical topic: text encoding.

Basically, text encoding is a method for representing text in a digital form. It allows you to record information about text -- for example, whether it is handwritten, or mentions someone’s name, or is the salutation of a letter -- right alongside the text itself.

3/23/11

In honor of this week's holiday (yes, I'm a few days behind), I thought I'd look a few decades beyond my usual focus on the 1920s and 30s.

I am still elbow-deep in the Albert M. Greenfield papers (collection 1959), which includes materials on an impressive array of topics, events, and notable people. Even Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

1/21/11

Though I'm now working with more recent materials, I couldn't resist one last Civil War-related post as we approach the 150th anniversary of the war.

Much attention will be placed on the anniversary of the start of the war: April 12, 1861, the date that Confederates opened fire on the federal Fort Sumter in South Carolina. But obviously tensions had been rising for years before that final breaking point.

12/1/10

I recently began work on a new digital history project here at HSP that will highlight one of our flagship collections related to the history of Philadelphia in the 20th-century: the Albert M. Greenfield papers (collection 1959).

11/10/10

Our processing work for the Digital Center for Americana pilot project is winding down. Over the last year, we’ve processed, conserved, described, and selectively digitized 51 collections at HSP that have ties to the Civil War.

9/1/10