Vincent Fraley

This Author's Posts

While waiting for the next subway or trolley, ride the city’s forgotten rails with the scrapbooks of George A. Foreman (1881-1950), a conductor, motorman, and depot dispatcher for nearly four decades.

Before the consolidation brought about by SEPTA in the 1960s, the city’s rail network was a tangled mess of independent operators and track owners. Foreman spent his career with two of these now-shuttered entities: the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company and its successor, the Philadelphia Transportation Company.

5/2/16

On the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, consider Philadelphia's ties to the Bard with excerpts from a 1934 address on the topic, delivered before the now-shuttered City History Society of Philadelphia by John Louis Haney, then-president of Central High School:

4/25/16

“A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.” - Jean Jacques Fougere Audubon, better known by his anglicized name, John James Audubon.

Forty-six years ago, Earth Day took root as Americans across the country raised their voices to protect the environment. For ‎this year's celebration, consider this detail from a lithograph of Arctomys monax, or a Woodchuck and Groundhog, found in Audubon’s The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America.

4/22/16

In his latest book, Gateway to Freedom, historian Eric Foner explores the hidden history of the Underground Railroad. Excerpts are below, supplemented by entries from Journal C of Station No. 2, compiled by William Still, one of Philadelphia's most prominent conductors.

4/18/16

Speaking from across the Delaware River in Camden, Walt Whitman described baseball as “America’s game,” with “the snap, go, fling, of the American atmosphere.” As the 2016 season gets underway, consider Shibe Park, onetime home to Philadelphia’s Athletics and Phillies, demolished 40 years ago this year.

Named after Athletics majority owner Ben Shibe, the stadium was bounded by what are now West Lehigh Avenue and North 20th, West Somerset, and North 21st Streets.

4/12/16
Comments: 2

The second in a new series, the following article was written by HSP Digital Services Intern Mark Carnesi and is being posted on his behalf. Stay tuned in the coming weeks as Mark continues his look at the George A. Foreman scrapbook collection. Read part one here.

4/7/16

Women account for more than a third of physicians in the United States. This was not always the diagnosis. Consider the story of one of the first American female doctors: Bucks County resident Susan Parry.

Before the Civil War, the quality of medical education and practice varied across the country. Sham schools opened on the Western frontier and awarded degrees as quickly as they could be printed, while a handful of cities – including Philadelphia – boasted long traditions of rigor and innovation. Most medical schools shared the same admission standard, however: men only.

4/4/16
Comments: 2

 

 

 

Numerous organizations and individuals supported the Underground Railroad. The daring escape of Henry "Box" Brown relied on the help of an unlikely ally: the mail.

3/27/16

 

 

 

 

The scale of the Civil War's carnage required radical changes to the United States' medical infrastructure.

In antebellum America, it was not to hospitals that infirm individuals would often turn. Hospitals, as modernly conceived, were rare and primarily for the indigent and insane. The horrid battles following the outbreak of the war, however, convinced Army administrators that this loose network was inadequate for battlefield casualties measured in the tens of thousands.

3/20/16

The first in a series, the following article was written by HSP Digital Services Intern Mark Carnesi and is being posted on his behalf. Stay tuned in the coming weeks as Mark continues his look at the George A. Foreman scrapbook collection. 

3/16/16
Comments: 2