Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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4/9/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

As commemorations this month mark the centennial of America's involvement in the First World War, we are confronted with images resurrected from a century prior. The square-jawed "doughboys" with cigarettes pressed between their lips seem as foreign to us as lighting up on a plane in 2017. Yet many of the myths animating our forebears 100 years ago continue to confound us today. For some historical perspective, consider the story of pilot Stephen Henley Noyes.

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4/7/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

As commemorations across the country mark the centennial of American involvement in the First World War, consider the story of the Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania (EAP), a women's organization founded to help wounded soldiers and distressed civilians alike.

At the outbreak of the conflict in 1914, a plurality of Philadelphians - like most Americans - favored a policy of neutrality toward the European war.

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4/6/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

The cables had started to stream in during the early afternoon. A passenger ship crossing the Atlantic sank with the loss of 1,200 lives – including 128 Americans. Chaos had erupted on board as the ocean steamer began to list. Prominent captains of industry and working class folks alike perished in the chilly water.

No, this ship isn’t the Titanic. And instead of an iceberg, the culprit was much smaller: a German torpedo.

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4/1/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

As the Phillies step up to the plate against the Cincinnati Reds on Opening Day, consider the story of Philadelphian Edith Houghton, Major League Baseball’s first female scout.

The daughter of a grocery goods distributor and semiprofessional baseball player, Houghton was born in North Philadelphia in 1912, the youngest of 10 children.

When her family moved to 25th and Diamond Streets, directly across from a baseball diamond, Houghton became captivated with the game. At 8, she was the on-field mascot for the Philadelphia Police League.

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3/27/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

Poetry fans wishing to mark the 125th anniversary of the passing of Walt Whitman - he died March 26, 1892 - should consider a trip across the Delaware to visit his Camden home.

New York rightly claims him as a native son, as Whitman grew up on Long Island and in Brooklyn. But as is the wont of bards, wanderlust drew him across the country.

At the height of the Civil War, Whitman made it to Washington, D.C., and worked as a nurse, providing cheer and doling out gifts of preserves and tobacco to his "dear comrades."

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3/14/17
Author: Jack McCarthy

 

 


“Philadelphia has the finest orchestra I have ever heard at any time or any place in my whole life. I don’t know that I would be exaggerating if I said that it is the finest orchestra the world has ever heard.”
      -Sergei Rachmaninoff

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3/13/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

This post is courtesy of Faye Allard-Glass, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Community College of Philadelphia, who will be moderating  Becoming U.S. – Age and Assimilation, a free program exploring the many ways age and generational status affect immigration and assimilation experiences.

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3/13/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

As crowds line the route of this year's St. Patrick's Day parade, consider the story of Irish immigration through the prism of the Union Army's Irish Brigade.

First some background. When many Americans think of Irish immigration, imaginations flock to the 19th century's crush of humanity chased from the Emerald Isle by famine and political oppression. But this forgets the early contributions of the "sons of Erin" in the nation's founding.

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3/6/17
Author: Vincent Fraley

Nearly 3½ centuries ago this weekend, a pacifist became the world’s largest crown-less landowner. On March 4, 1681, British monarch Charles II granted William Penn a charter for lands in the New World and “thus was a Quaker raised to sovereign power,” quipped the French philosopher Voltaire.

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2/28/17
Author: Cary Hutto

The following article was written by HSP volunteer Randi Kamine and is being posted on her behalf.

"My Dearest X.Y.Z. I want to tell you everything that has occurred lately and I want you to ask me questions which I am bound to answer.”  So begins the first entry in the diary written by Selina Richards Schroeder in early 1889."

Topics : 19th century, Women
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