Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

7/28/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

To Benjamin Franklin's successes in science, statecraft, and slyness, add a lesser-known exploit: postal service.

Among the many hardships of colonial life, lack of communication perhaps ranked right behind hunger and fear. In the absence of a service operated by the British crown, many fledgling colonies instituted private mail systems. In 1683, the Pennsylvania Assembly decreed "All justices of the peace, sheriffs or constables . . . empowered to press either man or horse" to deliver mail, allowing "two pence per mile to be paid out of the public stock" for any inconvenience.

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7/21/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

"That separate and distinct churches for colored people are now established here, and in different parts of the country, is a fact," begin the 1861 Annals of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas. Yet this fact was not always so firm.

During most of Absalom Jones' life (1746-1818), there existed no church edifice owned or operated exclusively by African Americans anywhere in the country. By the end of Jones' life, however, many black churchgoers could proudly call houses of worship their own.

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7/21/15
Author: Diane Biunno

Last month I attended the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents in Lincoln, Nebraska.  The Institute or “camp edit” was a five day workshop funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission and administered by the Association for Documentary Editing.

Topics: Politics
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7/14/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

Though it's now known as the Keystone State, Pennsylvania equally deserved its earlier nickname: the Coal State. Northeastern Pennsylvania at one time contained three-quarters of the world's anthracite deposits.
Beginning in the early 1800s, beleaguered Eastern European laborers flocked to this region. Carpatho-Rusyns (those living along the slopes of the Carpathian Mountains in present-day Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine) quickly became one of the anthracite region's most dominant ethnic groups.

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7/13/15
Author: Olivia D'Aiutolo

Hannah Glasse’s cookbook is the oldest of the four that I chose to focus on, with the exception of Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery (which holds recipes dating to Elizabethan times). Glasse was English, but her cookbook was widely used on the American continent.

Published in 1755, Glasse's cookbook looks its age. The front cover is completely detached and pages fall out left and right. When researchers hold the book in their hands, tiny pieces of paper sprinke the table below. 

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7/9/15
Author: Tyler Antoine

Before Stonewall, and long before the Christopher Street Pride Parade, there was Annual Reminder Day – a Philadelphia-based demonstration where gay men and lesbians protested for the same civil rights granted to their fellow heterosexuals.

The 50th anniversary of the first Annual Reminder Day, which occurred every July 4 from 1965 to 1969 in front of Independence Hall, inspired “Speaking Out for Equality: The Constitution, Gay Rights, and the Supreme Court,” the new exhibit at the National Constitution Center.

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7/8/15
Author: Olivia D'Aiutolo

If George Washington can be considered the father of our nation, then his wife, Martha, could be considered its mother. Although Martha received the cookbook from the mother of her first husband, Daniel Custis, Martha undoubtedly cooked some of the recipes for Mr. Washington. The book was then inherited by her granddaughter, Eleanor Parke Custis. George Washington has no direct descendants.

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7/8/15
Author: Sara Borden

You may have read the recently posted project update regarding the HINT project written by my colleague, Rachel Moloshok, in which she described our decision to reduce our number of annotated cartoons from more than 500 to approximately 125 cartoons.  Even with this reduction, we’re still generating a lot of metadata.  So, what are we going to do

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7/6/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

This weekend, people from across the country will gather at Independence Mall to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first "Annual Reminder" picket, the earliest recurring gay-rights demonstration in the United States.

In 1965, 40 buttoned-up protesters politely demanded their full rights as citizens of the United States in front of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, which was then still housed inside the hall.

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