Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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7/18/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Though they no longer take up formal residence in Philadelphia during their administrations, U.S. Presidents have long frequented the city and surrounding environs. As the Democratic National Convention draws near, trace the steps of previous Democratic presidents during their visits to the area.

Wheatland (1120 Marietta Avenue, Lancaster)

Comments: 0
7/14/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

When asked about French history, many Americans likely remember some combination of Marie Antoinette, the guillotine, and D-Day.

But perhaps the French figure that holds the most currency in American popular memory is the Marquis de Lafayette, a close friend of George Washington and a major-general who fought at Brandywine Creek, Monmouth Courthouse, and Yorktown during the American Revolution.

Comments: 1
7/14/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

#‎OnThisDay‬ in 1789, Parisians turned their noses up at absolute monarchy and stormed the Bastille. Known informally to Francophones as Le quatorze juillet, the occasion marked a turning point in the struggle against the then-kingdom's Ancien Régime.

Celebrate on this side of the Atlantic with a look at the intimate connection shared between Philadelphia and France in the form of the French Benevolent Society.

Comments: 0
7/12/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Today marks the 199th birthday of Massachusetts-born author Henry David Thoreau. Known to friends as "Hank the Crank," the transcendentalist visited Philadelphia only once during his life, in 1854. It was the farthest south he would ever travel.

“To Philadelphia. 7 A. M., to Boston, 9 A. M. to New York, by express train, land route," he wrote. "Arrive at 10 P. M.; time, four hours from New York, thirteen from Boston, fifteen from Concord."

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7/11/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Behind no less than five sets of locks – both electronic and analog, including a 19th century bank vault door – rest some of the most treasured items in HSP’s collection of over 21 million manuscripts, graphics, and books. Until now. 

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7/11/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

The Library Company of Philadelphia’s latest free exhibit, Common Touch: The Art of the Senses in the History of the Blind, explores the nature of perception via historical documents for the visually impaired. For Americans afflicted with full or partial loss of vision in the 19th century, Philadelphia offered a rare opportunity: an education.

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7/5/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Behind no less than five sets of locks – both electronic and analog, including a 19th century bank vault door – rest some of the most treasured items in HSP’s collection of over 21 million manuscripts, graphics, and books. Until now. 

Comments: 0
7/5/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

As the nation reflects on the meaning of freedom and liberty this Fourth of July weekend, consider an unsung heroine of women's independence: the bicycle.

Taking a broad definition of race and bicycle, Philadelphia women participated in one of the earliest competitions in North America featuring a two-wheeled, human-powered machine.

In 1819, artist Charles Willson Peale witnessed his daughters Sybilla and Elizabeth informally racing "downhill like the very devil" on his velocipede, an iron juggernaut and the first two-wheeler in the city.

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6/27/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Behind no less than five sets of locks – both electronic and analog, including a 19th century bank vault door – rest some of the most treasured items in HSP’s collection of over 21 million manuscripts, graphics, and books. Until now. 

Topics : 18th century
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6/27/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

This month marked the opening of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s new popup beer garden, the Viaduct Rail Park, at 10th and Hamilton. While the popularity — and legality — of these gardens may find their origin in the 21st century, the viaduct itself is more than 100 years old.

Built in the 1890s by the then-named Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad, the mile-long Reading Viaduct is a combination of embankment sections and arched masonry bridges stretching from Vine Street to Fairmount Avenue.

Topics : Industry
Comments: 0