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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is HSP's main blog.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well articles on interesting bits of local history reflected in our collection.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

HSP Blog

A Potluck from Martha Washington’s Cookbook

Always looking for relevant and interesting ways to connect with the items in our collections, staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania recently cooked our way into the historic kitchen of America's inaugural First Lady.  While few people are able to say that they’ve met the First Lady and even fewer can boast of sampling her cooking first-hand, HSP has unique access to a presidential pantry through Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery, which has been in our collections since 1892.  

For Tara O’Brien, who has revived dozens of dishes from historic cookbooks as Director of Conservation and Preservation, organizing a potluck from Martha Washington’s Cookbook seemed like a fun way to take advantage of this hidden gem by trying and sharing a bunch of historic recipes at once.  Her idea took off and staff began to peruse Mrs. Washington’s recipes, deciphering 17th century cooking instructions, considering ingredients, claiming which dish they would cook, and eventually testing out the first First Lady’s cooking in their own kitchens.  In a refreshing break from the normal Monday grind, co-workers shared their creations in a potluck lunch open to all HSP staff on July 21st.

Below you will find all the dishes from Monday’s potluck.  While there were a couple delicious deviations from the historic recipes-- ahem, I’m looking at you Ron’s Ribs and Not-so-Washington Beer & Cheddar Bread-- the rest of the recipes came straight from Martha Washington’s Cookbook.  The book itself is split into two sections, A Booke of Cookery and A Booke of Sweetmeats (desserts), and the recipes below are listed in their respective categories.

Though it might strike you as merely a novel experiment in the kitchen, the experience of engaging with history through food is of immense value.  Just as your own family recipes allow you to reconnect with your heritage or treasure the memory of loved ones, cooking historic recipes allowed us to form a connection to Martha Washington-- imagining the different cookware, ingredients, surroundings, and company in which the cookbook originated.  As you can see from the potluck photoalbum above, this study of history was far from dull and rather an adventure that produced tangible results.  We came away from the potluck nourished, not only from the historic dishes that literally fed us, but also from the act of eating and sharing our cooking as a community.  After all, half the enjoyment of food is that it brings people together and this is ultimately why cooking historic recipes is such a fulfilling way to engage with history.

Martha Washington’s recipes are outstanding by-the-way; the potluck was a sweet and savory success!


What do you think of cooking historic recipes?  Is it possible to relive history through food and the act of cooking or do you think this is a novel waste of time?  Do you consider family recipes to be historic?  Should teachers use food to teach history? 

Find more about Martha Washington’s original family cookbook and steal a recipe directly from it here.

Learn more about this blog series, A Philly Foodie Explores Local History

George F. Parry's Civil War Diaries: July 1864

Welcome back once again for another round of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. In celebration of Parry's work and the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I'm providing monthly posts on Fondly, PA of transcripts of entries from his diaries.

To see other posts in the series, check out the links over on the right-hand side of this page.  Clicking on the diary images will take you to our Digital Library where you can examine the volumes page by page, along with other digitized items from the Parry collection.

*****

In July 1864 the Atlanta Campaign continued to ravage both Union and Confederate armies. It was also a big month for Parry as he and his regiment faced Confederate forces in several skirmishes in various spots in Georgia. He noted the takeover of Marietta by the Union army at the beginning of the month. By the end of the month, Parry was in Lawrenceville still in the thick of it as his commanding officer had just refused a Confederate order to surrender.


Notes about the transcriptions: I've kept the pattern of Parry's writings as close as formatting here will allow, including his line breaks and spacing. My own additional or clarifying notes will be in brackets [ ]. Any grammatical hiccups that aren’t noted as such are Parry's own.


*****

Sunday, July 3
In a woods between Big Shandy and
the mountains now occupied by the Rebels own
Troops. Moved out at 10 A. M.
marched to the Left of Lost Mt.
by a great number of Rebel works
on into Marietta[,] a quite a place
mosly deserted. Captured a number
of Prisoners[.] Rebels in full retreat
went into camp at ten O'clock after
a Hard days[sic] and a exciting one.

*****

Saturday, July 9
the men then moved on the
Rebels across the River. dis-
Mounted. Reinforced by
G Division of Infantry.
Rossville Groville[?] a very fine|
place but all taken up
by our army. one of the finest
of places.

*****

Thursday, July 14
Marched about four miles South
and Camped
                         Afternoon Capt.
Hilbury and [I?] rode out[,] got
out side of Pickets and then
went in[.] found a Seceshs
Plantation[,] got Potatoes[,] Apples[,]
Chickens[,] tin ware[,] Books & [got?]
Back to Camp by dark.

*****

Monday, July 18
Moved out on Raid with three
Days Rations[.] Marched south
East[,] drove the Rebels fifteen
miles and destroyed five
miles of Atlanta + Macon Rail
Road[.] a very nice day and
Quite an exciting one
                               fell back
Five miles and encamped

*****

Friday, July 22
Marched all night some 30 miles[.]
Halted in the morning one hours for
rest and then proceeded one towards and
arrived at Covenington [Covington, GA][,] captured two
trains of cars[,] Burnt them[,] also des-
troyed one million dolls. worth of cotton[.]
Burnt Depots of cars and tore up
the Rail Road – fells back ten
miles and encamped for a few
hours in a woods - then

*****

        4 mich Cavalry
placed under arrest for capturing Horses
Saturday, July 23
Marched on in a north east
Direction – capturing a great amo-
unt of Horses[,] destroying much
cotton[.] arrived at La[w]renceville at
4 P. M. and encamped for the night[.]
The roads strewed with all kinds of
plunder. Living on the best of the
Land.     La[w]renceville quite a place
captured  a great many horses
and mules.

*****

Thursday, July 28
Up at 1 O'clock and at Day
light moves on the Rebels on
foot[.] fought them some time
Lieut. Brant wounded[,] also 2
Others.  at one time entirely
surrounded.  fell back to
the [illegible] roads and camped[.]
Flag of [illegible] sent in by the Rebels dem-
anding our surrender – Gen'l. [Ganard?]
could not see the point to surrender[.]

*****

A Philly Foodie Explores Local History

The City of the Cheesesteak, Philly history is found in the kitchen. Visitors Services Manager Sarah Duda gets to the meat of the matter, serving up stories from the hidden larder of Philly's unsung hash slingers. Food-related treasures in HSP's library and archive are cooked regularly on the Fondly, PA blog.


 

If I were to ask you to think about Philadelphia history, I suspect that thoughts of Benjamin Franklin, Valley Forge, and the Liberty Bell would start to fill your head as you search for memorable names related to Philadelphia.  While all of these topics are worthy of attention, my historical gaze is rather different and-- dare I say it-- more hungry then most when looking back on the decades that built the city of brotherly love into what it is today.  Since food is such an integral part of life, food history is not merely limited to food products and can also give insight into community, labor, politics, philosophy, and technology surrounding food.  If you are a foodie, a history enthusiast, or interested in hot topics related to food-- sugar, fast food, dieting, organic farming, global-warming, vegetarianism, GMOs, cooking, and food scarcity are just a few that come to mind-- then this is a blog for you.  Over the next two months, I will be exploring local history from a new angle as I uncover some of the hidden food-related treasures within our archives here at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and connect them to food today.

Stop by this Thursday to see history brought to life in food form...

Describing Political Cartoons: When John Bull Met Brother Jonathan

My colleague Rachel Moloshok and I recently finished selecting 512 historic political cartoons from HSP's collection to be part of our new digital exhibit for the Historic Images, New Technologies (HINT) project.

Soon, we'll begin diving into more focused research about these cartoons, and the people, events and symbols depicted in them.

As we've described before, the HINT project is developing new tools for managing and describing visual materials in archives. We're using political cartoons to demonstrate how these new tools will work, allowing us to not only transcribe captions or other text but also describe what apppears in the image itself. We plan to debut this new political cartoons digital exhibit in 2015, and plan to include other contextual content to help users better understand what they're seeing and to help educators incorporate these materials into the classroom. You can read more details about the project here.

That kind of historical background and context will be crucial for viewers who are unfamiliar with the cartoon icons and symbols that are no longer common, like John Bull, Brother Jonathan, Columbia, Salt River, and much more.

For instance, John Bull serves as a symbol for Great Britain. He typically appears as a stout man, often with a waistcoat (i.e. a vest) and frock coat. Brother Jonathan, in contrast, pre-dates Uncle Sam as a symbol for the United States, while Columbia is a female representation of America and liberty.

Here are just a few of the cartoons in HSP's collections that depict these icons:

Brother John Administering a Salutory Cordial to John Bull, circa 1813. (call # Bb 612 B795.1)

Columbia Teaching John Bull His New Lesson, 1813. (call # Bb 612 C723)

John Bull and the Baltimoreans, 1813. (call # Bb 612 Jb217)

A Kean* Shave Between "John Bull and Brother Jonathan," circa 1835-1836. (call # Bb 612 K193)

Little Mac Trying to Dig His Way to the White House But Is Frightened by Spiritual Manifestations, 1864. (HSP Cartoons and Caricatures collection, #3133)

George F. Parry's Civil War Diaries: June 1864

Happy summer folks! We're back again with another group of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. In celebration of Parry's work and the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I'm providing monthly posts on Fondly, PA of transcripts of entries from his diaries.

To see other posts in the series, check out the links over on the right-hand side of this page.  Clicking on the diary images will take you to our Digital Librarywhere you can examine the volumes page by page, along with other digitized items from the Parry collection.

*****

For Parry, June 1864 was a month of heat and fighting. He and his regiment were in northwestern Georgia, and they met the Confederate forces in a number of skirmishes throughout the month. Parry participated in the battles, and things didn't always go so well as he noted several times when his comrades were wounded, killed, or captured. There wasn;t much change during the month -- Parry trudged through the Southern heat same in the beginning of the June as at the end of it.


Notes about the transcriptions: I've kept the pattern of Parry's writings as close as formatting here will allow, including his line breaks and spacing. My own additional or clarifying notes will be in brackets [ ]. Any grammatical hiccups that aren’t noted as such are Parry's own.


*****

Wednesday, June 1
Order to be ready to move
at Light. Moved to the rear
towards Kingston eight miles[.]
very warm Dusty day[.] Horses starving
to death by Hundreds.

*****

Monday, June 6
Rode out[,] visited Cartersville[.] crossed
the river on a Pontoon Bridge. men
very busy building the rail road
Bridge across river[.] a very
Hot day. Cartersville quite a
Place[.] much out up now.

Hair Cut to Day

*****

Saturday, June 11
Up a[t] three O'Clock and moved
out on the Rebels at five. Move[d]
them back Eight miles. had a hard
fight with them[.] one man in our
Reg't Killed and many wounded
this was a very exciting day
I took a fine coffee pot

*****

Thursday, June 16
Rec'd a Letter from Home. Moved
on the Rebels at 12 [M?]. attacked
them on the West while Infantry
did on the north. a very exciting
day – our forces very successful
Slept most all day[.] moved out
At 5 P.M. to the Right

*****

Monday, June 20
Rec'd a Letter from Home –
                          Moved on the
Rebels and marched cautiously[.] a
very exciting day.
                          Rebels attacked
us in the afternoon and drove us
back – very severe fighting – num-
ber in our Reg't Killed + wounded
Capt Newton taken prisoner
Rainy in the Afternoon

*****

Saturday, June 25
A very warm Day[.] lying Still
All Day in Camp[.] I wrote
A Letter to Miss Lukens +
Julia V. Taylor. Rec'd a mail
[one?] letter from Sue[,] a news-
Paper. Drew rations till
July 1st.
             Mail went out at [illegible]

*****

Thursday, June 30
Rode out in the morning and
Took a view of the Rebel works[.]
Regiment went out on a scout
Mail[,] came back with no Letters for me
Hard rain in afternoon – very
Hot – flies [blow?] every thing –
Blankets[,] Coat &c.

*****

Full Steam Ahead: Historic Images, New Technologies

Although you wouldn't know from our presence on "Fondly, Pennsylvania," the team of HSP staffers working on the "Historic Images, New Technologies" (HINT) project has been diligently making progress since our last update in December.  You may recall from that introductory blog post, we are working to enhance our current image viewer as it appears on our Digital Library and functions in our Digital History Projects.

During the intervening months, a previous project associate, Sarah Newhouse, departed HSP.  We were sad to see her go, but we are excited to welcome Dana Dorman to the team.  Dana has worked on several of HSP's Digital History Projects and joins Rachel Moloshok to complete our dynamic duo of project associates.


An Unpleasant Ride through the Presidential "Haunted Forest, 1884 (HSP Cartoons and Caricatures collection, #3133)

Dana and Rachel have been undertaking the task of whittling down the list of more than 2,000 possible cartoons into a selection of approximately 500 that will be researched and receive the annotations that will form the core of the digital exhibit. Additionally, they have been updating the in-house TEI guidelines and procedures that will be used to display image annotations and enhance graphics discoverability.  We'll be using TEI, or Text Encoding Initiative, a form of XML, to encode and describe the political cartoon images as well as relate them to people, events, and places.



A Beautiful Fairy Tale, 1908

We are very excited about the possibilities and enhanced functionality of our new image viewer.  The viewer will allow for greater image manipulation, including image rotation as well as smoother zooming and panning.  These features will be in addition to the presence of clickable zones.  These zones will feature our pop-up annotations which will describe the topic, characters, and places depicted in a given cartoon.  The viewer will allow for these annotations to be turned on and off as the user chooses.

As the project progresses, we will be sharing much of the data that results from our encoding, as well as coding for the changes to the image viewer and Drupal, our digital history website platform.  We hope that a wide array of users will find this coding useful.  We also hope that archives and other repositories will utilize the improved image viewer in digital history projects of their own.


The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street, 1882

Additionally, the digital exhibit will feature several educational components.  We will create unit and lesson plans for elementary, middle, and high school students.  These plans will have the annotated cartoons at their center.  Some plans have already been created and can be browsed by clicking here (lesson plan for elementary students), here (unit plan for elementary students), here (unit plan for middle school students), and here (lesson plan for middle school students).  We plan to create several more lesson and unit plans, so keep watching for those.


Inauguration Day Outlook - Prospects of a Cleaning Up, circa 1903 (Hampton L. Carson Papers, #0117)

We have plenty more work ahead of us as the project develops over the next year before coming to an end in August of 2015.  As we continue our efforts, we intend to write several more blog posts on HINT.  You can follow our progress here on "Fondly, Pennsylvania" and on our project page, accessible by clicking here.  Please check back often!

Political Cartoons: Not Just for Educators

Archivists, historians, artists, and other political cartoon enthusiasts may be interested in a recent blog post on the Educators Blog regarding the project we're working on called "Historic Images, New Technologies" (HINT).  In the post, education intern Alicia Parks writes about "Incorporating Political Cartoons into Classrooms." 

Alicia's blog is primarily aimed at teachers, but other audiences may also be interested.  Alicia provides insights into the project, reasons why political cartoons are an important educational tool, and criteria for selecting the most useful cartoons for teachers, as well as archivists hoping to undertake an endeavor similar to HINT.

Click here to read Alicia's full post about the utility of political cartoons in the classroom.

Penmanship Part 2

Back in December we posted a blog on penmanship. At the same time I created a penmanship display for the window opposite the elevator in the library.

The display includes a wide range of  facsimile examples: script from the Bank of North America  ledgers, lessons from the Spencerian book on penmanship, facsimiles of practice workbooks, and a letter penned by Timothy Matlack (Scribe to the Continental Congress) signed by John Hancock, (President of the 2nd Continental Congress).  Matlack’s script became the basis for Copperplate, a style of penmanship scribes were trained to use throughout the nineteenth century.

Since the first blog post and display, there have been many incidental conversations about the fate of penmanship and cursive. The topic which comes up most often is the fact that K-12 students are no longer being taught cursive. Through one of these conversations we received an invitation to visit an archive of penmanship instruction!

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is currently hosting the Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR). The goal of HCI-PSAR  is to make better known and more accessible the important but often hidden archival collections held by the many small, primarily volunteer-run historical organizations in the Philadelphia area. The project is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.  Project Archivist, Celia Caust-Ellenbogen, invited Bart Everts, librarian at Peirce College, for a visit. Upon seeing the display case, Bart mentioned that Peirce College offered penmanship courses well into the 20th Century. Their library has a wonderful archive of examples from the courses. We were eager to  see the collection and Celia kindly arranged a visit for us. 

Bart pulled many wonderful examples from the collection including: scrap books of penmanship examples and flourishes, an album of penmanship awards, penmanship workbooks and pamphlets of the history of the College.

My favorite documents are the before and after letters. These are short sentances written by students on the first day of the penmanship course and a second sample upon completing the course.

The difference is remarkable!

The workbook of exercises is extensive:

The before and after example from Helen E. Bates:

The Table of contents for the course:

In addition to the penmanship examples, there are albums full of fancy flourishes:

The Internation Association of Master Penmen Engrossers and Teachers of Handwriting (IAMPETH) lessons webpage offers more information about creating these flourishes. 

After seeing this collection, the question comes to mind, were any of the clerks of the Bank of North America trained at Pierce college? It seems like a good possibility for clerks working at the bank in the latter half of the 19th Century. 

We took many more images than will fit into this post. For more examples and flourishes please visit our flickr stream.

George F. Parry's Civil War Diaries: May 1864

Greetings one and all. Welcome back to Fondly, Pennsylvania for more transcriptions from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. In celebration of Parry's work and the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I'm providing monthly posts on Fondly, PA of transcripts of entries from his diaries.

To see other posts in the series, check out the links over on the right-hand side of this page.  Clicking on the diary images will take you to our Digital Library where you can examine the volumes page by page, along with other digitized items from the Parry collection.

*****

Parry began May 1864 worlds away from where it would end, in a peaceful camp in Shelbyville, Tennessee. From there his regiment traveled south towards Georgia. The further they got, the more fighting they saw. This month marked the beginning of the Atlanta Campaign, with several notable battles taking place in Georgia. While Parry remarked upon different instances of fighting throughout the month, his notes concerning what we now know as the Battle of Dallas (May 26-June 1) are particularly moving. As bad off as the men often were, things were no better for the regiment's horses, as Parry also often noted.


Notes about the transcriptions: I've kept the pattern of Parry's writings as close as formatting here will allow, including his line breaks and spacing. My own additional or clarifying notes will be in brackets [ ]. Any grammatical hiccups that aren’t noted as such are Parry's own.


*****

Tuesday, May 3
Left Camp at Shelbyville at sunrise[.]
Marched till 5 O'clock passed through
Tullahoma and encamped six miles
beyond there on a very nice stream

one Horse Died and one give[sic]
out. Horses on half-rations
Some sport to day with Philip
Vosmer.  Very heavy Frost
and slept cold.

*****

Saturday, May 7
Our Horses receive no feed from
Friday Morning till this morning[.]
Parted with our teams and drew six
days rations[.] started at 12 M. passed
by the great Nic Jack cave and
rebel Saltpeter works. ascended a very
steep mountain[,] saw number of Grand
sights – coal works – water falls, &c.
mountain covered with wild flowers – enca-
mped for night on Mt. received a
Letter  + photographs from Home[,] also a
letter from Benj. Hough.

*****

Thursday, May 12 [written above date: "Vilino"]
Encamped all Day in woods at cross roads[,]
destroyed the town and the men burnt many
Houses[.] Heavy fighting on our left[,] saw
seventy five rebel prisoners pass by[.]
good news from the Potomac Army
very dirty but have plenty to eat to Day

Sergt. In Co. B shot through the
Heart by accident. Died instantly.
Sergt. Longwell More shot him.

*****

Wednesday, May 18
Moved at Six O'clock. Marched
very slow an cautiously all day
south by east. Rebels leave as we
advance.  Rations run out – very
Hungry – clear day and warm –
Our men in afternoon had a fight at King-
ston[,] some sixty 4th Mich. Lost. our
Brigade surrounded by Rebels. we
captured a few. things rather squally
Wilders men cut the Rail Road + Telegraph
between Rome and Kingston.

*****

Tuesday, May 24
Up at three and marched at Six
through a very rich productive country[.]
Took from a plantation two Hams – and
other eatables. Our forses[sic] came into
the Rebels at Dallas. Had a fight.
number killed + wounded. we fell
back to camp for the night.
suffered badly in afternoon + evening
with cramp in Stomach + Bowels
ate no supper[,] slept in an old barn.

*****

Sunday, May 29
                       found my blankets + Rations
had some breakfast. Dallas full of Woun-
ded[,] dead and dieing[sic]. Most dreadful
sights. All kind of surgical operations
on hand. Major Jennings and I went
back to wagon train. Moved to left at
night. Very heavy fighting in the night
on left off[sic] our Army. Major Jennings and
I slept on Pumpenkin Creek. This has
been a dreadful day.

*****

 

Political Cartoons on Display

“Drawn and Quartered: Cartoons from the Collection” opened at HSP on April 22. This document display presents a sampling of political cartoons from HSP’s collections spanning from the 1700s to the early decades of the 20th century. These cartoons, and many more, will be part of HSP’s Historic Images, New Technologies (HINT) project. For those who are unable to come in to HSP to see these cartoons in person, digital copies of the cartoons on display (and a few that had to be cut at the last minute for space reasons) can be viewed here:

http://digitallibrary.hsp.org/index.php/simpleGalleryEdu/Show/displaySet/set_id/662

The display is organized into four glass cases. A case of early American political cartoons features engravings and prints commenting on British taxation, the formation of the earliest American political parties, and Jacksonian democracy. In this section is the first American political cartoon to be lithographed:

A New Map of the United States with the Additional Territories on an Improved Plan (1828 or 1829)

A New Map of the United States with the Additional Territories on an Improved Plan (circa 1829). Lithograph by Anthony Imbert

A section on cartoons of the Civil War displays commentary on debates over the expansion of slavery into western territories in the 1850s, the formation of African American regiments, and the 1864 election that pit Abraham Lincoln against “Peace Democrat” George McClellan.

Your Plan and Mine (1864)
Your Plan and Mine (1864). Artist unknown; lithograph by Currier & Ives

A section on cartoons of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era features the work of political cartoon legend Joseph Keppler, who cofounded and drew for the popular illustrated magazine Puck, and local cartoonists such as John L. De Mar of the Philadelphia Record.

The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street (1882)
"The Deadly Upas Tree of Wall Street," in Puck,
August 30, 1882. Chromolithograph by Joseph Keppler

Finally, a section on Pennsylvania politics focuses on the unique personalities, scandals, and reforms that have shaped the Quaker state. This section boasts one of my favorite finds: an original political cartoon (that is, a pre-published draft, showing original pen-and-ink and collage work) by Thomas Nast, one of America’s most famous and influential political cartoonists, portraying Pennsylvania political “kingmaker” Matthew S. Quay in a sinister light.

The Silence of Matt Quay (1890

The Silence of Matt Quay (1890). Original cartoon by Thomas Nast

The display is free to view and runs until June 10...come check it out! And please follow our progress on the HINT project, which will feature 500 political cartoons from HSP's collections.

7/31/14
Author: Sarah Duda

Always looking for relevant and interesting ways to connect with the items in our collections, staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania recently cooked our way into the historic kitchen of America's inaugural First Lady.  While few people are able to say that they’ve met the First Lady and even fewer can boast of sampling her cooking first-hand, HSP has unique access to a presidential pantry through Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery, which has been in our collections since 1892.  

Comments: 4

7/30/14
Author: Cary Hutto

Welcome back once again for another round of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Comments: 0

7/29/14
Author: Sarah Duda

The City of the Cheesesteak, Philly history is found in the kitchen. Visitors Services Manager Sarah Duda gets to the meat of the matter, serving up stories from the hidden larder of Philly's unsung hash slingers. Food-related treasures in HSP's library and archive are cooked regularly on the Fondly, PA

Comments: 0

7/2/14
Author: Dana Dorman

My colleague Rachel Moloshok and I recently finished selecting 512 historic political cartoons from HSP's collection to be part of our new digital exhibit for the Historic Images, New Technologies (HINT) project.

Soon, we'll begin diving into more focused research about these cartoons, and the people, events and symbols depicted in them.

Comments: 0

6/25/14
Author: Cary Hutto

Happy summer folks! We're back again with another group of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Comments: 0

6/13/14
Author: Sara Borden

Although you wouldn't know from our presence on "Fondly, Pennsylvania," the team of HSP staffers working on the "Historic Images, New Technologies" (HINT) project has been diligently making progress since our last update in December.  You may recall from that

Comments: 0

6/12/14
Author: Sara Borden

Archivists, historians, artists, and other political cartoon enthusiasts may be interested in a recent blog post on the Educators Blog regarding the project we're working on called "Historic Images, New Technologies" (HINT).  In the post, education intern Alicia Parks writes about "Incorporating Political Cartoons i

Comments: 0

6/3/14
Author: Tara O'Brien

Back in December we posted a blog on penmanship. At the same time I created a penmanship display for the window opposite the elevator in the library.

Comments: 0

5/28/14
Author: Cary Hutto

Greetings one and all. Welcome back to Fondly, Pennsylvania for more transcriptions from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. In celebration of Parry's work and the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I'm providing monthly posts on Fondly, PA of transcripts of entries from his diaries.

Comments: 0

5/14/14
Author: Rachel Moloshok

“Drawn and Quartered: Cartoons from the Collection” opened at HSP on April 22. This document display presents a sampling of political cartoons from HSP’s collections spanning from the 1700s to the early decades of the 20th century. These cartoons, and many more, will be part of HSP’s Historic Images, New Technologies (HINT) project. For those who are unable to come in to HSP to see these cartoons in person, digital copies of the cartoons on display (and a few that had to be cut at the last minute for space reasons) can be viewed here:

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