Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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6/24/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Philadelphia's 10,000-acre Fairmount Park system is one of the largest such municipal spaces in the world. Yet the park's origins do not belong to any botanical benevolence.

Unlike Central Park - a deliberate attempt to preserve New York's dwindling green spaces amid urbanization - Fairmount began as a solution to a practical problem: providing Philadelphians with clean water.

Comments: 2
6/23/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

With the recent opening of Moore College of Art & Design's juried alumni exhibition, consider the story of the first visual arts college for women in the United States: Moore's antecessor, the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (PSDW).

Founded in 1848, PSDW was the first of several such institutions to appear in Boston, Pittsburgh, and Cincinnati.

However, art for art's sake was not the goal of philanthropist and PSDW founder Sarah Worthington Peter.

Topics : Women
Comments: 0
6/23/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

On this year's Juneteenth, the oldest known celebration commemorating the abolition of slavery in the United States, consider one of the nation's first cases involving the violation of its incipient slave-trade laws: the "Ganges Incident."

The USS Ganges, originally built for trade in the West Indies, was purchased in 1798 by the federal government to deter French privateers from ransacking U.S. shipping. It left Philadelphia's port that year, the first warship to sail under the American flag since the Continental Navy's last ship, the Alliance, was decommissioned in 1785.

Topics : Slavery
Comments: 0
5/13/16
Author: Cary Hutto

The following article is being posted on behalf of Tim Dewysockie, former intern of the archives department. Our thanks go out to him for the work that he completed on this important historical collection. --CH
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Comments: 0
4/12/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Speaking from across the Delaware River in Camden, Walt Whitman described baseball as “America’s game,” with “the snap, go, fling, of the American atmosphere.” As the 2016 season gets underway, consider Shibe Park, onetime home to Philadelphia’s Athletics and Phillies, demolished 40 years ago this year.

Named after Athletics majority owner Ben Shibe, the stadium was bounded by what are now West Lehigh Avenue and North 20th, West Somerset, and North 21st Streets.

Comments: 0
4/7/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

The second in a new series, the following article was written by HSP Digital Services Intern Mark Carnesi and is being posted on his behalf. Stay tuned in the coming weeks as Mark continues his look at the George A. Foreman scrapbook collection. Read part one here.

Comments: 0
4/4/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Women account for more than a third of physicians in the United States. This was not always the diagnosis. Consider the story of one of the first American female doctors: Bucks County resident Susan Parry.

Before the Civil War, the quality of medical education and practice varied across the country. Sham schools opened on the Western frontier and awarded degrees as quickly as they could be printed, while a handful of cities – including Philadelphia – boasted long traditions of rigor and innovation. Most medical schools shared the same admission standard, however: men only.

Comments: 1
3/27/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

 

 

 

Numerous organizations and individuals supported the Underground Railroad. The daring escape of Henry "Box" Brown relied on the help of an unlikely ally: the mail.

Comments: 0
3/20/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

 

 

 

 

The scale of the Civil War's carnage required radical changes to the United States' medical infrastructure.

In antebellum America, it was not to hospitals that infirm individuals would often turn. Hospitals, as modernly conceived, were rare and primarily for the indigent and insane. The horrid battles following the outbreak of the war, however, convinced Army administrators that this loose network was inadequate for battlefield casualties measured in the tens of thousands.

Comments: 0
3/17/16
Author: Cary Hutto

If you didn't know it already, HSP has a growing collection of books on historic cooking and the culinary arts! Here's a rundown of some books that were recently added to the library's collection. Click on the links for more information on each title from our online catalog Discover.

Comments: 0