Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

4/30/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

In my research on Jay Cooke, I read that Cooke had a private telegraph line.  When Matthew and I first surveyed the collection, we discovered several folders full of ticker tapes and queried one another about best practice for housing them.  It was helpful to have this piece of information to explain the quantity of telegrams in the Cooke papers.   They are rather fun to read, and add a bit of behind-the-scenes perspective on Cooke's voluminous formal correspondence.

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4/21/10
Author: Cary Hutto

I was going to start this blog post with a grandiose essay on the centuries-old relationship between man and dog that expounded upon some of the greatest philosophical thoughts of our time.  This was going to be followed by an exposition on the transformation of fashion in early 20th century America.

But really, why say in a thousand words what pictures can simply show:

Topics: Genealogy
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4/20/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

Finding aids are now available online for the following collections:

George G. Meade collection (#410) [This collection combines formerly separate collections 410 and 1407.

Grand Army of the Republic. Philip R. Schuyler Post No. 51 records (#1825)

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4/15/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

Today marks the anniversary of the death of Abraham Lincoln, who was assassinated in 1865 by John Wilkes Booth.  While there is little need to recount the events of April 14-15, 1865, when Lincoln and members of his cabinet were mortally wounded, the echoes of mourning in correspondence from the days following are worthy of a look.

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4/8/10
Author: Leah Mackin

When the Conservation Department received this 1807 land agreement from the Louis H. Carpenter Collection, it looked like this:

Topics: 19th century
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4/6/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

Early on in the Digital Center project, I worked on a description for the Robert Knox Sneden collection of "Sketches of Confederate Prisons."  I discovered that not only did this collection have an obsolete call number, but it was not listed in either our OPAC or our graphics card catalog.  The only way to find this collection was by searching our Access database.  This still remains true, and will until we import our database into Archivists' Toolkit sometime toward the end of the DCA project.  It pains me to know that little gems like the Sneden drawings are unknown to

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4/1/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

The Grand Army of the Republic was formed as a patriotic fraternal organization for veterans of the Union forces of the Civil War.   The GAR advocated for veterans' rights and offered aid to men who were honorably discharged and had never taken up arms against the nation.  Many men were disqualified from membership from the GAR, but were interested in the camaraderie and opportunities for service that the GAR provided.  To meet this desire, the Grand Army of the Republic decided to allow the creation of associations called the Citizens' Corps.  In its 36th national

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3/24/10
Author: Cathleen Miller

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3/18/10
Author: Cary Hutto

In terms of processing, the HSP archives department had a good 2009 and is off to a good start in 2010.  In this time, staff processed and improved access to almost 50 collections.  Following up on Cathleen’s previous post, here are just a few highlights.  Others can be found on our website.

 

HSP collection of Benjamin Franklin papers, 1628-1951 (Collection 215)

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3/15/10
Author: Willhem Echevarria

When you visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s webpage and read the description of what we do, you’ll find a reference to additions to our collection of documents acquired in 2002 from The Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies. Although HSP has excelled in keeping and providing access to valuable documents about American colonial history, we do hold collections pertaining to Latino (or Hispanics) groups that have settled in Pennsylvania.

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