Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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8/17/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

When it comes to Philadelphia's connection to the history of television, many believe it to stretch only as far as the hemlines and pegged pants of modish teens on American Bandstand. However, the city's pixilated past deserves a high-definition look.

It was at the Franklin Institute that inventor Philo Farnsworth demonstrated the first electronic television set to the public. TV Guide launched its channel safaris from a small office in Center City, while the inventor of instant replay, Tony Verna, also called the city home.

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8/12/15
Author: Diane Biunno

In a few short weeks we’ll be wrapping up work on the Historic Images, New Technologies (HINT) Project. While working on the two year project, we’ve come across many interesting and funny political cartoons.

One of our favorites is Join, or Die. It was published by Benjamin Franklin in the Pennsylvania Gazette, and is most likely the first American political cartoon. The cartoon shows a snake cut into eight pieces and makes the point that the colonies must unite in order to defend themselves against tyranny.

Topics : Politics
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8/4/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As pro golfers head to the 97th PGA Championship in Wisconsin this month, local golfers can tee up with a look at Philadelphia's intimate connection to the game through Rodman Wanamaker, son of the department-store magnate John Wanamaker.

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7/30/15
Author: Olivia D'Aiutolo

As a foodie, one of my favorite things to do is explore the city discovering new restaurants and cafés to try. My personal focus is on the use of new and fresh ingredients and the nutritional quality of the items offered. Philadelphia is a gold-mine for my hobby; there are hidden restaurants you would never even hear of without having explored the city on your own. Each establishment I venture into has its own ambiance, which can often help you make a decision on where you want to eat.

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7/29/15
Author: Cary Hutto

Greetings! Thanks for coming back for more transcribed entries from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

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7/28/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

To Benjamin Franklin's successes in science, statecraft, and slyness, add a lesser-known exploit: postal service.

Among the many hardships of colonial life, lack of communication perhaps ranked right behind hunger and fear. In the absence of a service operated by the British crown, many fledgling colonies instituted private mail systems. In 1683, the Pennsylvania Assembly decreed "All justices of the peace, sheriffs or constables . . . empowered to press either man or horse" to deliver mail, allowing "two pence per mile to be paid out of the public stock" for any inconvenience.

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7/21/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

"That separate and distinct churches for colored people are now established here, and in different parts of the country, is a fact," begin the 1861 Annals of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas. Yet this fact was not always so firm.

During most of Absalom Jones' life (1746-1818), there existed no church edifice owned or operated exclusively by African Americans anywhere in the country. By the end of Jones' life, however, many black churchgoers could proudly call houses of worship their own.

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7/21/15
Author: Diane Biunno

Last month I attended the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents in Lincoln, Nebraska.  The Institute or “camp edit” was a five day workshop funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission and administered by the Association for Documentary Editing.

Topics : Politics
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7/14/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

Though it's now known as the Keystone State, Pennsylvania equally deserved its earlier nickname: the Coal State. Northeastern Pennsylvania at one time contained three-quarters of the world's anthracite deposits.
Beginning in the early 1800s, beleaguered Eastern European laborers flocked to this region. Carpatho-Rusyns (those living along the slopes of the Carpathian Mountains in present-day Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and Ukraine) quickly became one of the anthracite region's most dominant ethnic groups.

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