Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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1/20/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

If virtuous art in government buildings guaranteed good governance, Pennsylvania's state Capitol would produce only first-rate politicians, heroically adorned as it is with the murals of pioneering American artist Violet Oakley.

Oakley (1874-1961) spent her childhood in Bergen Heights, N.J., and Philadelphia filling voluminous sketchbooks. In an unfinished autobiography, Oakley revealed that if she did not have a pencil and paper, she sketched on the roof of her mouth with her tongue.

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1/19/16
Author: Lucas Galante

 

Lucas Galante is the winter 2016 Bennington College intern at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP). Tune-in as he explores Philadelphia's music history on Fondly, PA as part of Memories & Melodies, HSP's multi-program series. 

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1/14/16
Author: Sun Young Kang

In my previous blog post, I introduced the watermarks of several English papermakers and their forgers. In this post, I would like to share some of the watermarks of the pioneers of American paper manufacturing found in ledgers from the Bank of North America collection.

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1/11/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

"In God we trust."

The obverse of every modern U.S. coin is stamped with this, America's national motto. Many hold this as an affirmation of a Christian origin of the American republic, while others argue - often in court - that freedom of religion may also be construed as freedom from religion. As debate kicks up concerning which faces and phrases adorn U.S. fiat currency, consider a brief history of the minted maxim:

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12/30/15
Author: Cary Hutto

Dear fans and followers, this is it! We've reached the final set of transcriptions from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). A huge thank you goes out to everyone who took a few moments to check out Parry's life through these transcriptions. Hopefully they were as interesting to read as they were to write!

Topics : Civil War
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12/27/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As families gather for the holidays, consider the marital dedication espoused by an unlikely couple: George Armstrong Custer and his wife, Elizabeth "Libbie" Custer.

In the portrait of popular memory, the flamboyant "Boy General" is often synonymous with hubris and disaster. In his lifetime, however, Custer's name was garlanded with gallantry. It was to the long-haired blond Custer that a grateful Gen. Philip Sheridan gifted the table at which Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox - an event Custer observed firsthand.

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12/20/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As the rows of local theaters fill for holiday productions of The Nutcracker and A Christmas Story, consider Philadelphia's dramatic relationship with the stage through the story of Frank McGlinn, the "grand old man of the theater."

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12/14/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

For a man who seems to have read few books of history, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump displays a knack for re-creating some of its bleakest chapters. 

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12/14/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

On Dec. 13, 1799, George Washington set out on his Mount Vernon estate to mark for felling a copse of (non-cherry) trees. The stroll through his gardens and farm would be the retired president's last. By the end of the following day, Washington was dead.

Tobias Lear, Washington's personal secretary, stood at the pained 67-year-old's bedside throughout. Lear's account offers an intimate look into Washington's final moments, and the stoicism with which the "American Cincinnatus" met death. Emphasis is Lear's own.

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12/9/15
Author: Megan Evans

The following article was written by HSP volunteer Randi Kamine and is being posted on her behalf. Many thanks to Archival Processor Megan Evans for helping prepare these articles for publication. To read the first part of this article, please click here or on the article's title in the right sidebar.

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