Family History In China Today: Cultural Heritage, Economic Development, Pop Cultur
6/1/15
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China has a long tradition of kinship studies, including the compilation of genealogies.  During the Cultural Revolution, Mao had many such records burned and ancestral temples destroyed because they glorified individual families and harkened to the “feudal” past. Since China’s reforms from the 1980s, there has been a outpouring of work on family history and genealogy in new ways. The uses of Qian family history today may shed light on contemporary Chinese society, economy, and state. Presented by Dr. Cecilia Chien on March 7, 2015 as part of Family History Days.

Colonial New Jersey Research
6/1/15
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In this lecture recorded at Family History Days on March 6, 2015, Joe Klett will provide an overview of genealogical resources at the New Jersey State Archives relevant to the colonial period, including records of the East and West Jersey Proprietors. He also discussed proprietary-period New Jersey geography, which is the topic of an upcoming publication he has prepared for The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey.

Resources in the Pennsylvania State Archives
6/1/15
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This video, presented by Linda Reis, was recorded during Family History Days on March 6, 2015. Linda worked for thirty five years as head of the Processing Section at the Pennsylvania State Archives before retiring in August, 2014. She is also the editor of Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, published by the Pennsylvania Historical Association.

Would I Lie to You?
6/1/15
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As part of Family History Days held at HSP on March 6, 2015, Carol Sheaffer and Nancy Nelson discuss how to sort through family stories and other sources to find your ancestors.

Voicing the Absent: Crafting History
5/12/15
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In this video recorded at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, historian Jane Kamensky, filmmaker Louis Massiah and Ain Gordon discuss the ways historians try to describe past events as they really happened. They aim at faithful representation. Yet we cannot know what others feel and think, and so historians must always take license with their subjects.

 

Researching Your Irish Family
5/12/15
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Irish family history has always been described as difficult because of the absence of 19th century census data.  In this video recorded at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on December 3, 2014, professional genealogist Frank Southcott looked at the importance of basic family research in the United States and explore the various alternative resources to develop the Irish family in Ireland.