Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is HSP's main blog.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well articles on interesting bits of local history reflected in our collection.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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3/22/19
In 1794, the New Theatre in Philadelphia premiered Slaves in Algiers; or A Struggle for Freedom, a play written by the author, lyricist, and actor Susanna Haswell Rowson. The pioneering production—deemed radical by critics—dealt with poignant themes relating to gender and liberty, topics that Rowson explored regularly in her novels.
Topics : Arts and Culture
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3/15/19
Inspired to begin researching your Irish heritage? You’ll need more than luck! Here are a few tips to get you started in your search.
Topics : Genealogy
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3/14/19
In 1869, an enterprising young man in Philadelphia named Francis Wayland Ayer founded N. W. Ayer & Son, a company that would revolutionize the way that businesses communicate with their customers.
Topics : Business
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3/8/19
The Masonic Hall met a grim fate on March 9, 1819. A chimney fire spread into the building and eventually engulfed the entire structure. Residents of New Castle, Delaware purportedly saw the flames from 32 miles away. A lithograph from HSP’s archives depicts the harrowing scene.
Topics : 19th century
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2/12/19
Highlighting Philadelphia’s creative reuse of historical buildings, a major institution from the city’s theater past reopened this past year: the Metropolitan Opera House.
Topics : Arts and Culture
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2/12/19
The most recent issue of Pennslvania Legacies highlighted 1960s protest in the Keystone State. Want to learn more? Check out some recently published books and online resources exploring the turbulent Vietnam era—both in Pennsylvania and throughout the United States.
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2/11/19
The Sixties were a watershed in American history: societal norms were upended and civil rights were expanded; major protests, political assassinations, and devastating riots occurred, and young people were central to the action of the decade. As we move into what seems to be a new era of youth activism, today’s students will find resonance with their own lives and times as they learn about some of the milestone events that took place 50 years ago.
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2/1/19
For decades, pay inequality between men and women has been an issue in the business world, in entertainment, in politics, and in the sports arena. One collection at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania documents the efforts of several women to level the playing field in at least one of these areas: women’s tennis. One of the women represented in this collection is tennis player Billie Jean King, who may be most famous for her 1973 “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match in which she beat Bobby Riggs in three straight sets. But this match was only her second foray into the fight for gender equality—she first was a member of the “Original 9”.
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2/1/19
In popular and scholarly accounts of the American 1960s, student protest looms large—and for good reason. The Vietnam War transformed many campuses into centers of opposition to American Cold War foreign policy. At the same time, campus protest turned millions of working-class Americans against “activist” universities that offended their sense of patriotism and refused them admission—while taking their tax dollars.
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1/31/19

These reviews were published in the fall 2018 issue of Pennsylvania Legacies (vol. 18, no 2): Protest in 1960s Pennsylvania.

Book Reviews

By Christopher A. Brown

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