Media Library

Browse HSP's media library to view photographs from past events and exhibits, audio and video recordings, and documents.

Recent Posts

Catholic Philadelphia
12/4/15
The Accolade Ukrainian Chamber Choir of Philadelphia, who enlivened us all with their performance of traditional Ukrainian Christmas carols.

In many of Philadelphia's ethnic neighborhoods, the Catholic church has served not only as a place of worship, the institution also helped keep alive ancestral traditions and connections among newly-arrived immigrants to the United States. In the spirit of the World Meeting of Families, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explored this legacy through a holiday Catholic church fair. On Thursday, December 3, we invited churches and parishes from across the 5-county Greater Philadelphia area to share the story of their church and their unique holiday customs.

Exploring the Card Catalog: Getting Started
12/3/15
To begin, please visit familysearch.org and create a free account (highlighted in red below).    Once you’ve created an account, please hover your cursor over “search” in the top bar, and click “records” from the drop down menu (highlighted in red below).
Embedded in Ink
11/25/15
Playwright Ain Gordon, HSP's Embedded Artist.

Diane Roka, a Philadelphia-based artist, writer, and "documentary-style drawtographer," attended HSP's program, Unpacking a Psychiatrist: The 217 Boxes of Dr. Henry Anonymous, on November 18. A part of the multi-year An Artist Embedded project, the program explored the life and legacy of Dr. John Ercel Fryer, a Temple University professor of psychiatry and nearly-forgotten pioneer of LGBT rights.

217 Boxes: A Protest In Disguise
11/19/15
Dr. John Fryer, disguised as Dr. Anonymous, addressing the 1972 American Psychiatric Association annual meeting. Activists Frank Kameny and Barbara Gittings joined Fryer.

On November 18, HSP invited the public to discover a nearly-forgotten pioneer of the LGBT rights movement, Dr. John Fryer of Philadelphia – i.e. “Dr. Anonymous” – in a program combing performance and discussion.

Playwright Ain Gordon unveiled the first excerpt of his upcoming play exploring Fryer's story with a dramatic performance and conversation discussing Gordon's process - creating historical fiction from intensive primary source research - and connecting Fryer's address with the current fight for LGBT rights.

Abolition and the Liberty Bell: Dr. Emma Lapsansky
10/29/15
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Emma Lapsansky presents the changing meaning and scope of historical symbols, celebrations, and collections over time.

“Remember the Women”: Holly Holst
10/22/15
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Holly Holst considers how people in the Women's suffrage movement made symbolic use of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell. By so doing, the leaders of the suffrage campaign were able to link their pursuit of the vote back to the ideals of the American Revolution.

Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement in the North: Dr. Tom Sugrue
10/22/15
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Thomas Sugrue tells the story of the civil rights movement in the North and comments that, while it was similar to the movement in the South, the nature of the struggle for equality in the North was vastly different. This lecture was given on the second floor of Independence Hall, an important site of protests during the civil rights movement.

Creation of Independence Mall: Dr. Charlene Mires
10/22/15
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Charlene Mires discusses the creation of the space known as Independence Mall and Independence National Historical Park. Through her lecture you can experience the dramatic evolution of a few city blocks in Philadelphia through the 20th century.

1865 - A Nation Reunited
5/22/15

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This April marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War. After four years of bloody conflict and over 620,000 casualties, the long process of healing and reconciliation could begin. As soldiers returned home, and a people made free, many sought to create a better, stronger Union.

Voicing the Absent: Crafting History
5/12/15

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In this audio recorded at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, historian Jane Kamensky, filmmaker Louis Massiah and Ain Gordon discuss the ways hsitorians try to describe past events as they really happened. They aim at faithful representation. Yet we cannot know what others feel and think, and so historians must always take license with their subjects.

The Truth Behind "Hold These Truths"
5/12/15

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This is an audio recording of the event held at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. The program begins with a presentation by Dr. Franklin Odo, visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania. It's followed by  a sneak peak of Hold These Truths, performed by local actor Makoto Hirano, a one-man show about the real life journey of Gordon Hirabayashi, the man who famously defied forcible removal and took his case all the way to the Supreme Court... twice!  It concludes with a discussion between Dr.

Preserving American Freedom in the Classroom
12/19/13

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David Reader wrote the lessons plans for Preserving American Freedom and talks about as a teacher using primary sources in the classroom and how other teachers can utilize Preserving American Freedom in their own classrooms as well.

The Contested History of American Freedom
12/19/13

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Eric Foner explores the centrality of freedom to America’s identity and its complicated legacy.

Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University and the author of numerous works on American history. His most recent book is The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery, winner, among other awards, of the Bancroft, Lincoln, and Pulitzer Prizes.

Citizenship and Freedom in Post Civil War America
12/19/13

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In the late 19th century and early 20th century, Walter Licht explores who is considered a rightful citizen of the United States and what rights and liberties these citizens could or could not exercise.

Walter Licht is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches American economic and labor history.  He is an award-winning author of historical studies on industrialization, work, and labor markets.

The files below supplement Kim Gallon's article "The Blood Demonstration: Teaching the History of the Philadelphia Welfare Rights Organization," published in Teaching Pennsylvania History, a special collaborative issue published jointly by the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography and Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies.

1/9/15
Reports/Articles

The files below supplement Mary Carroll Johansen's article "Pennsylvania’s Past from a Unique Perspective: Oral History," published in Teaching Pennsylvania History, a special collaborative issue published jointly by the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography and Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies.

1/9/15
Reports/Articles

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11/17/14
3/27/13
Reports/Articles
9/4/12
Presentations

Presentation covering the use of primary sources with board games for history education given at Gencon's 2012 Trade Day conference.  It provides methods for educators and students to create their own scenarios using primary sources and existing boardgames to better understand history through simulation.

The four scenarios covered within the presentation for use with Settlers of America: Trails to Rails can be downloaded here.

8/13/12
Presentations