PAS Papers Box 4A Manumissions
Habeas Corpus Actions

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Report of Com.

Comitte
1810  Comitte
4 mo 11                                    
Present
Thos BlokerThos Phipps[1]
Jos M Paul [2]
Alexanr Scott
James Gray                       Alex Scott  -  -  of Louden County
Hannah Henry                    Virginia on 7 day morning about lost about
And child_                         three o’Clock in the morning of ?????
Two dec inst ????

Gray, Haneh Henry in ???? and infant child and had them before???? Douglass between five & six when T T Hoff and their Master attended _ _ was dischagd for want of faith??? Only to appehend [offend?] the sd Gray and Hannah who come Md???? from xxxxxxxxx???? be Dr Clark to give them opportunity to prove their freedom    P A Brown[3] & Mr. Grenel[4] were employed by their xxxxx friends who advised to take out a writ of Habeus Corpus which was obtained  the caus was removd to the Court of comen pleas before the cause was called  on inquiry the it was found that they could not prove their freedom  it was thought to bargin with their ????? for ther liberty which was done.  Gray was to pay 350 dollar for his liberty  Hanah 250 which is to be paid in 6 months a number of  ?????????? until into hand for the payment[??]

The following Acctt was presented and and order ???? to be drawn on the Treasurer _
The Acting comitte to Bulah Banks[??]
1810 4 mo 1
To ?? Frk Harper [??] and room for one year  20-00


[1] Thomas Phipps, Guardian of the Poor and an active member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, lived at 169 High Street in 1810.  James Robinson, The Philadelphia Directory, for 1810, 221.

[2] Joseph M. Paul, a merchant and long an active member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, resided at 95 North Fifth Street in 1810.  James Robinson, The Philadelphia Directory, for 1810, 216.  Paul was later lauded because his “devotion to the cause of the oppressed, and particularly to everything which had a tendency to the improvement of the coloured people, was conspicuous during many years.”  Edward Needles, An Historical Memoir of the Pennsylvania Society, for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery (1848; Arno Press reprint, New York, 1969), 86.

[3] Peter A. Browne was an attorney in Philadelphia in 1810 and resided at 64 South Sixth Street.  James Robinson, The Philadelphia Directory, for 1810, 48.

[4] William Grinnel, attorney, lived at 71 South Fourth Street in 1810.  James Robinson, The Philadelphia Directory, for 1810, 120.