Traditional Irish Music by Blackthorn
3/30/15
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John McGroary, Michael Boyce, and John Boyce of Blackthorn performed traditional Irish music after the Leaving the Emerald Isle event on 11-11-14 at HSP.

Leaving the Emerald Isle
3/30/15
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During the mid 19th century, large numbers of Irish citizens made the perilous journey to America with the the hopes of escaping poverty, famine, and oppression. As thousands of immigrants made Philadelphia their home, they were met with religious and ethnic prejudices.  Moderated by Charlene Mires, professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, this panel of experts examines the challenges and issues faced by the Irish as they struggled to integrate into American society.

Genealogy 101: Colonial Records at HSP
2/10/15
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This October, HSP held a series of Genealogy 101 sessions that detailed useful resources in our archive when conducting research on your family history. This session, Head of Research Services David Haugaard guides you through Colonial Records here at HSP and elsewhere.

William Still and the Pennsylvania Vigilance Committee
1/7/15
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The Philadelphia Vigilance Committee helped runaway slaves relocate within northern Free states and Canada. Committee Chairman William Still interviewed the runaways and kept a journal documenting their escapes and experiences in bondage. This discussion, recorded at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on October 22, 2014 featured Christopher Densmore and Phil Lapansky. It was part of a month-long celebration of Moonstone Arts Center’s Underground Railroad in Philadelphia

Canononizing Homophile Sexual Respectability: Archives, History, and Memory
11/24/14
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In this lecture recorded at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on October 2, 2014, Dr. Marc Stein used Philadelphia LGBT history to explore the sexual dimensions of the past when historians, librarians, archivists, publishers, and others construct and reconstruct historical narratives.

Lost in the Great War, Resurrected from the Archives
11/24/14
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Over twenty-five hundred service people from Philadelphia lost their lives in the Great War, and each of them had a story. While some live on through their descendants, many died young with no heirs. As a result, there was no one left to remember and share the story of their lives.