Archival Adventures in Small Repositories

The goal of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's "Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories" (HCI-PSAR) is to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections at small archival repositories in the five-county Philadelphia region. These include volunteer-run historical institutions, museums, fraternal and ethnic organizations, community groups, churches, clubs, and other non-profit organizations with important archival collections. The project is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This blog will document the adventures and experiences of Project Surveyors as they visit historical societies, museums, historic sites, and other small archival repositories in the five-county Philadelphia area.

 

 

9/19/12
Author: Michael Gubicza

Well our one year pilot program is coming to an end. We have visited 47 repositories and surveyed 513 collections. That equals 4,666 linear feet of materials. That’s enough to fill 11,190 document boxes!  That’s the equivalent of 58 Blue Whales (the largest mammal on earth), or 175 school buses in length! 

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9/11/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

HSP's upcoming History in Pennsylvania Awards (HIP Awards) next month will honor several participants in the "Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories." We're very proud of them, and hope that you'll join us on October 19, 2012, to celebrate their accomplishments!

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9/4/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

We are very pleased to announce that the finding aid site for HSP’s Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) is now online. The Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL) has agreed to include finding aids created through the HCI-PSAR project on their online union catalog at http://dla.library.upenn.edu/dla/pacscl/index.html.

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8/29/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Are you looking for sources on your historical research topic, but desire a fresh alternative to the well-trodden archival canon? Try a small repository!

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8/22/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Before James H. Hirokawa bought his home in Montgomery Township, Pa., the seller checked with all the neighbors if they were willing to live near a Japanese man. The year was 1945, and Hirokawa had just been released from an internment camp.

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8/15/12
Author: Andree Mey Miller

"When balmy summer breezes blow, and music fills the air . . ." these lines from the song, "My Willow Grove Sweetheart", conjure up thoughts of summertime fun and the endless amusements to be found at Willow Grove Park, an area amusement park well documented in the collections of the Upper Moreland Historical Association. 

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8/8/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Guest blogger Ashley Harper writes about Bartram's Garden, the oldest surviving botanic garden in North America, and home of some amazing archival materials!

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8/1/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Imagine a private home bigger than the White House. Now imagine it outfitted with machine guns trained on proletariat-uprisers, and now trained on Nazi art thieves. Now imagine it transformed into laboratories... If you're having trouble picturing all that, visit the Springfield Township Historical Society to see their extensive collection on Whitemarsh Hall!

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7/25/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

A lot has changed in 225 years, but some things have stayed the same. When the squat building nestled in a corner of the St. James' Episcopal Church cemetery was built in 1788, it was a schoolhouse for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. Today, it is still a space dedicated to teaching--but now, as the St. James' Community History Center, the focus is history.

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7/18/12
Author: Celia Caust-Ellenbogen

Philadelphia Sketch Club, America's oldest continuously-operating club for artists, was founded in 1860. That means 150 years of accumulated art, artifacts, and archival materials!

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