Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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6/22/17
Author: Brendon Floyd

Not unlike today, after an election, there is a need to try to reunite the country. After taking the oath of office on March 4, 1817, President James Monroe was hungry to repair the political disorder between Democratic-Republicans and Federalists. Though the War of 1812 had ended two years before Monroe’s inauguration, the Capitol in Washington D.C.

Topics : 19th century
Comments: 0

3/14/17
Author: Jack McCarthy

 

 


“Philadelphia has the finest orchestra I have ever heard at any time or any place in my whole life. I don’t know that I would be exaggerating if I said that it is the finest orchestra the world has ever heard.”
      -Sergei Rachmaninoff

Comments: 0

2/28/17
Author: Cary Hutto

The following article was written by HSP volunteer Randi Kamine and is being posted on her behalf.

"My Dearest X.Y.Z. I want to tell you everything that has occurred lately and I want you to ask me questions which I am bound to answer.”  So begins the first entry in the diary written by Selina Richards Schroeder in early 1889."

Topics : 19th century, Women
Comments: 0

2/24/17
Author: Beth Twiss Houting

History is a mystery, especially for events that occurred more than 100 years ago.  With no one around who was a witness, the evidence is often sketchy at best.  A newspaper article, a photograph, a letter – each piece only whets the appetite by offering a tantalizing clue. 

Historians, like real life Sherlock Holmeses, search out all the evidence they can find and then apply their honed skills of reasoning to create an interpretation of what happened. Even then, they don’t always have all the right information – and they may come to incorrect conclusions. 

Comments: 0

2/24/17
Author: Beth A Twiss Houting

This post is shared on behalf of Andrea (Ang) Reidell, Educational Specialist, National Archives.

Comments: 0

11/18/16
Author: Lee Arnold

Amid holiday tumult, Lee Arnold, HSP's Senior Director of the Library & Collections and Chief Operating Officer, takes a humorous look at hidden Thanksgiving "history."

Topics : Native American
Comments: 0

9/6/16
Author: Hali Han

For my third and final blog post, I had originally planned to profile several individuals living in Philadelphia’s Chinatown at different points in its history. As I sifted through boxes of documents and folders of photos, however, I found this task nearly impossible. 

Despite having gone through stacks of Christmas cards and business letters, newspaper clippings and various personal collections, I felt as if I barely understood these individuals better than those anonymous faces featured in black and white photographs published in period newspapers. 

Topics : Ethnic history
Comments: 0

8/30/16
Author: Hali Han

Every Sunday, my parents bring home a copy of The World Journal Weekly (Shi Jie Zhou Kan), the Sunday edition of a newspaper circulated in the Chinatowns of the United States documenting everything from world events and economic news to articles addressing issues pertinent to the Chinese American community. I remember that these pages of colorful newsprint would litter the house, and for the longest time, I paid little attention to them.

Topics : Ethnic history
Comments: 0

8/23/16
Author: Hali Han

Following independence from Great Britain, it became especially important for America to create ties to the rest of the world that had previously not been necessary under British rule. Demand for commodities like tea, porcelain, and silk meant that American merchants had to quickly find a way to establish trade routes with China directly. Along with New York and Boston, Philadelphia became a key city from which vessels like the one shown below departed for Canton (now Guangzhou).

Topics : Ethnic history
Comments: 0

8/23/16
Author: Hali Han

This has been my summer for first encounters.

Topics : Ethnic history
Comments: 0