Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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8/23/16
Author: Hali Han

Following independence from Great Britain, it became especially important for America to create ties to the rest of the world that had previously not been necessary under British rule. Demand for commodities like tea, porcelain, and silk meant that American merchants had to quickly find a way to establish trade routes with China directly. Along with New York and Boston, Philadelphia became a key city from which vessels like the one shown below departed for Canton (now Guangzhou).

Topics : Ethnic history
Comments: 0
8/23/16
Author: Hali Han

This has been my summer for first encounters.

Topics : Ethnic history
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8/19/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

For this year's ‪World Photo Day‬, consider the 1843 daguerreotype of Copenhagen-born scientist Martin Hans Boyè, claimed by its creator, Robert Cornelius, to be the “first posed photograph for a book illustration."

Exposed in Philadelphia only four years after the process of daguerreotypy debuted in France, opportunities for "firsts" still remained plentiful.

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8/18/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Upon the 19th Amendment's ratification on this day in 1920, Philadelphia was the largest city – and Pennsylvania the largest state – in which women had not previously had the right to vote.

This was not for want of trying.

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8/16/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

As The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints' new temple in Logan Circle opens for public viewing, consider Philadelphia's ties to early Mormon history.

Though the church was founded in New York and associated with Illinois and Utah, Philadelphia played a significant role in its early history.

Missionaries had reached Chester County and parts of central New Jersey by the 1830s. In 1839, the Philadelphia branch of the church was organized by Joseph Smith Jr. while returning from Washington, D.C.

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8/9/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

On the 234th anniversary of the creation of the Badge of Military Merit - later renamed the Purple Heart, a medal much in the news lately - consider the history of the Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania (EAP), a women's organization founded to help wounded soldiers and distressed civilians alike.

At the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, a plurality of Philadelphians - like most Americans - favored a policy of neutrality toward the European war.

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8/4/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

As thousands of folks fly out of town after the Democratic National Convention, consider the ground upon which Philadelphia International Airport sits: Hog Island, once the world's largest shipyard.

Long before William Penn arrived aboard the Welcome in 1681, Swedish settlers controlled the island, at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill. The Lenape called the island Quistconck, or "place for hogs."

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7/25/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

As Philadelphians brace for the crush of humanity arriving for the Democratic National Convention, commiserate with your counterparts in 1948. That year, the city hosted three conventions - Republicans, Democrats, and Progressives - the only city ever to do so in the same year.

That these three parties clamored to host their shindig in Philadelphia is perhaps not surprising. The city played host to the most famous convention of all, that which created the U.S. Constitution.

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7/22/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Though they no longer take up formal residence in Philadelphia during their administrations, U.S. Presidents have long frequented the city and surrounding environs.

To celebrate the 2016 Democratic National Convention and HSP’s free PoliticalFest exhibit, trace the steps of previous Democratic presidents during their visits to the area.

Our second feature looks at the 1938 visit to the Gettysburg battlefield by the 32nd President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Topics : Civil War
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7/20/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Though they no longer take up formal residence in Philadelphia during their administrations, U.S. Presidents have long frequented the city and surrounding environs.

To celebrate the 2016 Democratic National Convention and HSP’s free PoliticalFest exhibit, trace the steps of previous Democratic presidents during their visits to the area.

Our first feature looks at the 1915 visit to Philadelphia’s Convention Hall by the 28th President, Woodrow Wilson.

Comments: 0