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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is HSP's main blog.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well articles on interesting bits of local history reflected in our collection.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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George F. Parry's Civil War Diaries: February 1863

Welcome to the second installment of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). In the event that you're just joining in, or have perhaps forgotten what this is about, HSP recently acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War, 1863-1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. In celebration of Parry's work and the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I'm providing monthly posts on Fondly, PA of a few transcripts from his diaries.

To see other posts in the series, check out the links over on the right-hand side of this page.  Clicking on the diary images will take you to our Digital Library where you can exmaine the volumes page by page, along with other digitized items from the Parry collection.

*****

This month we move onto February 1863. When we last left Parry, he was enjoying crisp winter evenings, outings with friends, and plenty of general merriment. Not so surprisingly, this trend continued into February. Let's take a glimpse into his daily whereabouts.


Notes about the transcriptions: I've kept the pattern of Parry's writings as close as formatting here will allow, including his line breaks and spacing. My own additional or clarifying notes will be in brackets []. Any grammatical hiccups that aren’t noted as such are Parry's own.


Thursday, February 5
Paxsons Store dancing

Chas. Leedoms drinking

cider

Presbyterian Church

Business very dull

snowy and rainy

*****

Tuesday, February 10
Came home.
                            Loaned Joseph
M. Scott a milk tube

attended a Party in Newtown
Hall. Managers John Linton
Geo. C. Worstal kept it
up till half past two
very nice time
John Linton a very nice young
man, his home is Sacramento, Calif.

*****

Thursday, February 19
Enos Tomlinson

Stephen Cornell

Party at Major Buckman's
spent the evening at Rose's
playing chicquards with
David Leedom Esq. Blaker
Ordered some medicine
                           Geo Ashmead

*****

Monday, February 23
Medicine arrived from
Ashmead
                  Eli Buckman

Henry Taylor
Took a number of Newtown
Ladies out to Barnsleys.
had a good time. Eliza Buckman
Dr. Smith letter from Holland

Pauses

I'm posting this entry on behalf of my intern, Ethan Fried, who performed extensive amounts of research and writing for the Preserving American Freedom digital history project, funded by Bank of America. For this project, Ethan described and annotated 50 documents that help trace the evolution of American liberties and composed biographies of related people and organizations. Ethan is a recent graduate of Pennsylvania State University and holds degrees in History and Secondary Education. His previous work as an undergraduate writing tutoring and high school teacher has left him determined to relate the intrigue of history to young people.

Pictured: Barbara Gittings in 1994

Coming into work on the SEPTA rail line offers a unique perspective on Philadelphia. Sprawling and large, the cityscape proves a sharp relief from my own hometown of Langhorne. Each day as I commute, while the rails squeak and the murmur of passengers fills the car, I often feel like I'm traversing worlds. In truth, I’m not yet comfortable walking around the city, save for my own route to the Historical Society. But the city, a modern incarnation of the place countless documents I've studied described, becomes more and more familiar by the day.

One such experience came just a few weeks ago on my way to work. Taking my usual 11th street exit from Market East Station, turning rightward towards City Hall and making a left onto 13th street, I noticed the name Barbara Gittings above the street corner of 13th and Locust. While not explicitly described by name, Gittings, famous for her progressive stances and tactics promoting gay rights, was a direct inspiration (and indeed, architect) of the "Dr. Anonymous" speech in the Preserving American Freedom exhibit. Countless times, I have walked through that intersection and looked upon that faceless name with an unknown history. But now that I know who she is, I can't help but pause, if only for a moment, at the foot of her namesake's sign. Just as I was exploring the old Philadelphia through manuscripts, letters, and maps, so was I encountering modern Philadelphia for the first time.

Speech of "Dr. Henry Anonymous" [John Fryer] at the American Psychiatric Association 125th Annual Meeting [May 2, 1972]

Speech of "Dr. Henry Anonymous" [John Fryer] at the American Psychiatric Association 125th Annual Meeting [May 2, 1972], one of 50 documents featured in the Preserving American Freedom project

This may be the most important effect of what I do here at HSP: to make history too important not to pass signs like Gittings's without a pause of understanding. The results of her efforts, and the efforts of the gay rights community, are clear. The Philadelphia "Gayborhood" is lined with rainbow signs and bars with names that drip with clear and public double entendre. Across the nation, gay rights supporters march ahead with the legalization of gay marriage, most recently in Maryland and Washington. All of this is a far cry from the reality of someone like Barbara Gittings. In her adolescence, homosexuality was considered a mental disorder. It took the courage of John Fryer, a gay psychiatrist that masked himself as he told his medical association that he could be both a productive psychiatrist and a homosexual to prompt the AMA to remove homosexuality from their list of disorders in 1973.

And although it's sometimes hard to dissociate the great movements of history from the people that sparked their creation and continued their sustenance, the past remains made by individuals like Barbara Gittings and John Fryer. The fact is, history can be so hard to connect with because it presents a place and time removed from our own. But when history is seen as a million intimate narratives, with a million voices, opinions, lives, and destinies, it becomes something else entirely. It becomes relatable. It becomes traceable. It becomes pause-worthy.

So the next time anyone asks why history can move and change us, and why it fills us with both wisdom and courage, I suggest bringing them to the corner of 13th and Locust and tell them the story of a man and woman who fought too hard for history to forget them. My guess is, they won't need to ask you that question anymore.

Conservation of the Bank of North America records sponsored by Wells Fargo

In November the Conservation Department at HSP started its latest grant project; conserving the Bank of North America Collection.Generously funded by Wells Fargo, this project will focus on repairing approximately 650 volumes, 400 graphics, and several boxes of loose manuscripts. Over the next three years conservation staff will be reparing and stabilizing ledgers, minute books, account books, stock certificates, and currency of the first bank in the United States. The collection is also being processed and we look forward to a new finding aid to help research within the collection.

We are excited to be working on such an important collection. Conservation technicians, Alina Josan, Leah Mackin and Sun Young Kang spent the first week assessing and assigning a priority number to each volume.

A book ranking a 5 needs the most work, while a 1 is in excellent condition and will mostly likely only be vacuumed.

The bank records have been on deposit with HSP since the 1920’s. Since then, many researchers have used the collection, but to us, the Conservation staff, much of this is new. We have the opportunity to work quite intimately with the materials and are looking forward to the exciting little discoveries. We will share some of the finds we think are most interesting. For example:

*Here is the request by the bank to Benjamin Franklin Bache (Ben Franklin's grandson) to print pennies.

*Clerks of the 18th and 19th centuries spent just as much time doodling on the covers of their notebooks as we did in school.

*There are quirky things we find amusing, such as interesting typo’s...

How do you spell ledger?

*The copper printing plates for currency and stock certificates

*and  my personal favorite so far, a typed note next to Mordecai Lewis’ account, informing us that this account was continuously open for the entire existence of the bank.

We will also write posts about how we are actually doing the conservation work. It will not be without its challenges. For one thing, most of the ledgers are approximately 20 inches tall and some as thick as 6 inches. These are very big books! So big that they don’t fit into our standard book binding equipment and we have had to be very inventive.

Check in with us during the next three years; we will be blogging about our challenges and discoveries. Be sure to check out our flickr stream as well. You can find that here.

Time Traveling and American Freedom

I am posting this on behalf of my intern Jacob Roberts, who is working on the Preserving American Freedom Project, funded by Bank of America. This project seeks to digitize, transcribe, and create an online exhibit of fifty documents from HSP’s collections that represent the history of liberty in the United States; Jacob is researching, adding annotations, and writing descriptions for these documents. He holds a B. A. in History from Wesleyan University.
 

I joined the Historical Society of Pennsylvania as an intern in September 2012 to work on the Preserving American Freedom project. The project aims to transcribe, digitize, and annotate fifty notable documents from HSP’s collections and turn them into an online exhibit. In my short time here, I have researched and written about more than twenty of these items along with Ethan Fried, another intern. At this point in the project, we are finished with annotations and descriptions of every document, as well as most of the biographies of people and organizations who appear in the documents.

I have worked on items which include everything from an early draft of the United States Constitution  to an eyewitness account of the tense negotiations leading up to the massacre at Wounded Knee Creek. Even though I have a degree in history, the eclectic nature of this project has forced me to learn an incredible amount of new information about events and people of which I previously knew very little.

Although most of my research has involved secondary sources, such as books and journal articles, I have also been granted access to the (often fragile) original documents. For anyone with enthusiasm for history, the experience of handling the actual paper that has been written on by the person you are researching feels like time travel. Articles and books can provide a compelling background, but holding an authentic document will metaphorically transport you into the shoes of the writer. While interning at HSP, I get to experience this every day.

One example of this sort of time travel occurred while I was conducting research on the Drayton family. The related document for the project was a letter sent from Thomas Drayton to his brother, Percival.

One of the documents in the Preserving American Freedom Project: Letter from Thomas Drayton to Percival Drayton, April 17, 1861

The siblings were on opposing sides of the Civil War and desperately tried to convince each other to change positions. In the course of my research, I wanted to find out who the rest of the Draytons were. I started my search by digging through a box of Drayton family correspondence. I found many letters along with a number of envelopes that had broken wax seals. Incredibly, the imprints in the wax were still visible. I picked out a translucent letter and held it in my hands; it looked so frail that I was surprised when it did not disintegrate. The ink had become brown with age, but the elegant handwriting was still beautiful to behold. The letter was from Anna Drayton and addressed to her grandmother, Maria Heyward Drayton. As I later found out, Maria was actually Anna’s step-grandmother, but Anna spoke of her as if she were her biological grandparent. Anna and Maria were on different sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, but their familial bond was clearly powerful enough to transcend the divide of the Civil War. By the time I had carefully replaced the letter in its folder, 1861 didn’t seem so far away.

Although we have accomplished a lot while working on the Preserving American Freedom project, there is still much left to be done. Our current task is translating all of our written content into an XML file and uploading it onto the website. In any case, I know that more research will involve more time travel, and I look forward to reporting on those experiences in future updates.
 

Finding Faces in the Leonard Covello Collection

With over 1,000 photographs, there was a wealth of topics that interested me as I digitized the Leonard Covello collection over the course of my internship. Leonard Covello (1887-1982) was an Italian immigrant who established and served as principal of the Benjamin Franklin High School in New York City. He is well known for his community centered school philosophy and his activism among the East Harlem neighborhood, especially with Italian and Puerto Rican immigrant groups. The Covello Photo Group serves as a portal to mid-century New York City architecture, street scenes of East Harlem, glimpses into the education system of the 1940’s and 1950’s, images relating to race and ethnicity just before the Civil Rights movement, and more.  What struck me the most, however, was the way I grew to form a relationship with the collection and how digitizing photos of strangers became not unlike my own hobby of digitizing family photos.

When I was given the task of digitizing this large collection this fall, I knew nothing of Leonard Covello or East Harlem. In fact what I knew of mid-century New York came entirely from the television program Mad Men. At the onset, I expected that this project would teach me about Covello. But as I worked, many faces became familiar to me and I grew to learn a great deal about figures from Covello’s world. Here are my favorites:

Fiorello La Guardia

Fiorello La Guardia (1882-1947)

La Guardia is a great example of the Covello collection’s domino effect. Midway through the project as I was browsing Wikipedia and reading entries related to East Harlem, I came across a face I was sure I had seen before within the collection. After comparing Covello’s images to images on web, I was sure that La Guardia’s was the face I had seen in photos of Benjamin Franklin High School’s opening, graduation ceremonies, and parades! La Guardia (namesake of the airport) is primarily known for serving as New York’s mayor from 1934-1945 and was  the first Italian-American to hold that office. La Guardia had early connections to East Harlem; the community elected him to Congress in 1922 and he served in that office until 1933.

Leonard Covello and Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra (1915-1988)

One of the more controversial moments during Covello’s tenure as principal of Benjamin Franklin High School was a racial incident between students in 1945. The incident sparked sensationalized press reports, calling the event a “riot.” Covello began a campaign to ease fears and reaffirm the school’s commitment to integration. The finale of this campaign was a morning address and performance by Frank Sinatra, the most popular singer of the time, who sang “Aren’t You Glad You’re You?” to the students in attendance.

Mae West and Rev. Andre Penachio

Mae West (1893-1980)

A double take was the only reaction I could think of when I came across an autographed photo of Mae West with a priest within the collection. An inscription on the back identifies the man as Reverend Andre Penachio and an image search of Ms. West’s signature verified that it was indeed the legendary film and vaudeville actress. A New York Times article explained that West and Penachio had been good friends. He officiated her burial and campaigned for West to be commemorated  on a U.S. postage stamp. Fun trivia fact: Penachio himself appeared the 1972 film The Godfather.

Felisa Rincon de Gautier

Felisa Rincón de Gautier (1897-1994)

A name I did not recognize appeared as a signature and on the back of several of Covello’s photographs. With some digging, I found that the woman was Felisa Rincón de Gautier, mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico from 1946-69. She was the first woman to be elected as mayor of an  American nation and worked with Covello on the Goodwill Ambassador program, sending New York City high school students to Puerto Rico for Christmas in 1959 and 1960.

Vito Marcantonio

Vito Marcantonio (1902-1954)

The Covello collection contains an entire section of photographs of Vito Marcantonio, from an infant at 49 days old to his later years as an American Labor Party politician and New York Representative of the East Harlem district. He was one of the community leaders who helped Covello sort out the controversial racial incident that led Frank Sinatra to perform at Benjamin Franklin High School.

Anna C. Ruddy

Anna C. Ruddy (b.1861)

The Covello Collection contains beautiful portraits of Anna C. Ruddy throughout her life. A Canadian missionary, Ruddy worked in East Harlem for eight years when she decided to establish a settlement house in 1898, offering children’s programs, a nursery, Bible and citizenship classes, and classes in sewing, cooking, and carpentry. During Covello’s lifetime, the settlement house was known as the Home Garden and later the La Guardia Memorial House. The collection contains photographs pertaining to the house, photos of Ruddy, and even a program and menu from a reunion dinner.

Joseph Monserrat

Joseph Monserrat (1921-2005)

Joseph Monserrat began as a student at Benjamin Franklin High School and mentee of Covello. He went on to direct the Migration Division of the Puerto Rican government where he collaborated with Covello on Migration Division projects. He also served as president of the Board of Education of New York from 1969-1970.

 

These faces became familiar to me throughout working on the collection, and it was a delight to see their names and faces pop up every now and again in different aspects of Covello’s world. And just like personal family photos, sometimes one comes across a face that seems familiar but can’t be found in memory. I found this photograph in the Portraits group just after the photo of Reverend Andre Penachio with Mae West. Do you recognize this couple? The Digital Collections team is dying to know!

Rev. Andre Penachio and two unknown people

Please leave your suggestions in the comment section below.

George F. Parry's Civil War Diaries: Introduction and January 1863

If you've been keeping up with recent HSP news, you've probably seen a press release documenting records of the Parry family that we recently acquired.  These two wonderful collections, one the George F. Parry family volumes (Collection 3694) and the other of Susan Parry volumes (Collection 3695), contain interesting and in-depths glimpses into the history of medicine and veterinarian medicine in Pennsylvania during the 1800s.

The Parrys were born into a Quaker family in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  George F. Parry (1838-1886) became one of the first veterinarians (and probably the first from Pennsylvania) to receive professional veterinary training in the United States. He graduated from the Boston Veterinary Institute in 1859, served as a veterinary surgeon with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry during the Civil War, and conducted a private practice in Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, from shortly after the war until his death at age 48.

The Parry siblings are surely interesting enough to warrant their own blog post, but it is George F. Parry in whom I am currently interested.  For you see, among Parry's diaries are three he kept during the Civil War, from 1863, 1864, and 1865.  HSP and many other historical institutions around the nation are currently in the midst of remembering the 150th anniversary of the Civil War through exhibitions, programs, and writings.   To kick off this year, I will be doing monthly postings of a few transcriptions from the corresponding month in Parry's diaries.  So this month, January 2013, we'll take a look at couple of Parry's entries from January 1863.  Throughout the year, we'll be tracking Parry's movements from his pre-war life in Bucks County, to his mustering (in June) in the army, to his travels beyond the state's borders and his wartime activities.  It's sure to be an interesting journey, so please read along and leave comments!

To see other posts in the series, check out the links over on the right-hand side of this page.  Clicking on the diary images will take you to our Digital Library where you can exmaine the volumes page by page, along with other digitized items from the Parry collection.

*****

At the beginning of 1863, Parry was living in Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He had received his degree a few years prior, though it's a little unclear if he was practicing at this point.  Parry often remarked about people he had visited, and here are a few of his January highlights.


A few notes about the transcriptions:  I will keep the pattern of Parry's writings as close as formatting here will allow.  My own additional or clarifying notes will be in brackets []. Any grammatical hiccups that aren’t noted as such are Parry's own.


Saturday, January 3
Called to see Dr. J. C.
Smith New Hope ------
Smiths Lambertville
Thompson     " [ditto]
--- --- --- --- ---
Arrived at home at 4 pm
Wm. Connard -----

*****

Sunday, January 11
Spent afternoon and Eve.
at Franklin Cadwallader
had a very pleasant time
accompanied by Julia V. [Taylor?]
arrived at home 11 O'clock
at night

Call Chas. Roberts ---- morning

*****

Sunday, January 18
Levi Buckman
Chas. Roberts

Quaker meeting and
Episcopal  Church ----
Evening went to Capt.
Eyre with Miss Thompson

very cold and clear

*****

Saturday, January 31
Wm. Lintons

Spent the evening at David
Waston's had a splendid
Dinner. [A]ccompanied by
Tom Linton. Guests
Miss Thompson Taylor
Geo. Worstal
had a very gay time
Home at 1 o'clock

Celebrating Emancipation, Preserving Freedom

January 1, 2013, marked the 150th Anniversary of Lincoln's final Emancipation Proclamation, and a special issue of the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, of which I am proud to be the Assistant Editor, commemorates this transformative moment in American history. Yet it is not just because I've spent the last few months editing the latest scholarship on emancipation that freedom has been on my mind. I am also the Project Director for an exciting digital history project for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania entitled Preserving American Freedom. For this project, made possible by a generous grant from Bank of America, 50 documents from HSP's collections that explore American freedom over more than 300 years will soon be presented online. Users will be able to explore facsimiles of the original documents, read their transcriptions, and learn more about the people, organizations, and events associated with them through scholarly essays, document descriptions, annotations, biographies, a timeline, and related media, including images and links to other documents in HSP's digital library. For this project, Eric Foner, the foremost historian of American freedom, has contributed a brilliant contextual essay on this topic's contested legacy, which is also reprinted with his permission in PMHB's January 2013 issue.

Freedom is complicated. The Emancipation issue of PMHB makes this clear—over 100 pages of scholarship grapple with the context and legacy of one document from one defining era of American history. A copy of the Emancipation Proclamation is one of the documents from HSP's collections that users will be able to explore when the Preserving American Freedom project goes live. There are 49 other documents featured in the project, each with a legacy as difficult to encapsulate.

How do we at the HSP take on such an expansive task as "Preserving American Freedom" when freedom is difficult to define, so fraught with conflict? This question has no definitive answer, but I have some thoughts. First, we preserve the written and physical heritage of American history—a history that has been constantly shaped by the idea of and struggle for freedom—literally: by performing top-notch conservation work, by housing these items safely and securely, and by digitizing these objects so their contents might live on even after they have physically crumbled away. Crucially, we also preserve American freedom by sharing these documents with the public. By providing and encouraging access to these historic works, the ideas and stories they tell live on in people's minds and hearts—to be commemorated and celebrated, yes, but also to be played with, wrestled with, and used to view the past, present, and future in new lights. In so doing, we not only tell and re-tell stories about American freedom, we participate in freedom's legacy of struggle, striving, and innovation.

The Preserving American Freedom project will not tell a simple narrative of American freedom—no such story exists. But it will provide the opportunity not just for the HSP but for all the project's visitors to continue Preserving American Freedom by continuing to engage with its complicated legacy.

Here She Is, Miss America

This Saturday, January 12th, a new Miss America will be crowned amidst the glitz and glamour of the Las Vegas strip, a far cry from the pageant's humble origins on the Atlantic City boardwalk.  Thankfully, for those who yearn for the days when bathing beauties roamed the Jersey shore, you can travel back in time with these historic images recently added to HSP's Digital Library

The Miss America pageant was the brainchild of the Businessmen's League of Atlantic City, who, in an effort to attract tourists to the shore destination after Labor Day, organized a so-called Fall Frolic in September 1920.  The most popular event at the Frolic was a parade of maidens who were wheeled down the boardwalk in wicker chairs to the cheers of an adoring crowd.  The success of the parade, as well as the current popularity of newspaper-sponsored beauty contests in which winners were selected based on photo submissions, planted the seed for an "Inter-City Beauty Contest" the following year.
Contestants at the first Miss American pageant, 1921

Billed as a beachfront "bather's reveue" of "thousands of the most beautiful girls in the land," the first Miss America pageant in September 1921 attracted only a handful of participants from a number of East Coast cities, including New York, Philadelphia, and Camden.  The contest commenced with the arrival of "King Neptune" at the Atlantic City Yacht Club and consisted of popularity and beauty contests judged according to both the crowd's applause and points awarded by a panel of judges.  The winner was 16-year-old Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C., who received $100 and a "Gold Mermaid" trophy.  Gorman notably resembled Mary Pickford, one of the most popular film stars of the era, and even garnered praise from admirers like American Federation of Labor President Samuel Gompers. Speaking of Gorman to The New York Times, Gompers reportedly remarked "she represents the type of womanhood America needs--strong, red-blooded, able to shoulder the responsibilities of homemaking and motherhood.  It is in her type that the hope of the country rests."  

1939 Miss America contestants pose with King Neptune

Within a few years time, the Miss America contest quickly grew into a popular annual spectacle, attracting more than 70 participants by 1923.  Until 1944, when a $5000 scholarship was awarded for the first time, winners primarily earned fees for appearances and endorsements.  These fees often proved quite lucrative; during her reign, Miss America 1926, Norma Smallwood, grossed $100,000, exceeding the yearly income of both Babe Ruth and the President of the United States.  Throughout the 1920s and 30s, contestants represented a range of sponsors at the pageant, appearing on behalf of cities, resorts, and theaters.  A rule requiring participants to represent states went into effect in 1938, though every state was not represented at the pageant until 1959.  By that time, the Miss America pageant took place at the Atlantic City Convention Center, the first of many changes that progessively moved the contest away from its beachy beginnings.  Another similar change occured in 1948 when, for the first time, Miss America was crowned in an evening gown rather than the traditional bathing suit. 

Miss American contestants in Philadelphia, 1942

While the popularity and allure of the Miss America pageant has faded over time, the contest earned an enduring legacy as part of  the history of Atlantic City and the wider mid-Atlantic region in the 20th Century.  For a taste of Miss America's Philadelphia connections, check out this photograph of contestants from the 1942 pageant posing with City Hall as a backdrop. Throughout the 1940s, contestants routinely toured Philadelphia before departing for Atlantic City on the "Shore Queen" out of Broad Street Station. Smile, ladies, William Penn is watching!

Mathew Carey: Publisher and Politician

Philadelphia has a long and storied history in the printing and publishing worlds.  Here was founded one of the nation's earliest papers mills as well as its first prominent newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette.  Ranking high among America's early publishers was Mathew Carey (1760-1839).

Mathew Carey was born in Dublin, Ireland; and he immigrated to America in 1784 with nine years of experience as a printer and publisher already under his belt. When the Marquis de Lafayette, who had met Carey a few years earlier in Paris, learned of his arrival in America, he sent Carey a check for $400 with which to establish his own business. Naturally, Carey chose publishing and bookselling. He formed Mathew Carey & Company in 1785, which went on to become one of the city's and the nation's most successful publishers.  His original company changed names and hands over the decades and in the early 1900s became known as Lea & Febiger, a well-known publisher of medical works throughout much of the twentieth century. 

During the course of his own career, Carey published over forty medical works; however, he also published broadsides, novels, atlases, bibles, and political titles, including some of his own writings such as Vindiciae Hibernicae (1819), New Olive Branch (1820), and Essays of Political Economy (1822).  Carey devoted his life to political economics after he left the publishing business in the early 1820s.

Recently, HSP was introduced to a new blog that speaks to Carey's involvement in politics: Secession And Mathew Carey.  By way of introduction, here is the text from the blog's "About Us" section:

Mathew Carey (1760-1839) used the pseudonym of “Caius,” a character from King Lear who was loyal but blunt. When Mathew Carey feared New England would secede from the Union, he read everything he could find on the history of civil wars. In that spirit, “Caius” offers a historical perspective for political discussion.

For years, Mathew Carey languished in obscurity. Now, partisan politics are increasingly rancorous. Threats of secession are making headlines. Mathew Carey’s works have new relevance.

This blog offers intriguing glimpses into Carey's political life as well as the history of New England after the Revolutionary War. It's an interesting and pertinent source for Mathew Carey researchers, for folks who are interested in the history of this nation's growing pains during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, or for those who want to delve into the workings of United States–British relations of the 1800s. 


For further information on Mathew Carey and his works, HSP has several relevant collections, including the Edwards Carey Gardiner collection (#227A) and the Lea & Febiger records (#227B).  Plenty of additional resources, both published and unpublished, can be found in our online catalog Discover.

Root Vegetables

When I tell people I love to cook from cookbooks that are 150 to 200 years old, I am always surprised by those who cringe. The first question is always, “Eew – how could it be any good?” Second question, with a look of disgust on the face is, “What did they eat back then?” Answer: same as we do! People have always loved good food. The other reaction is that everyone thinks the food was so rich; cream and butter everywhere. While it is true, Mrs. Emlen does use a lot of butter in her kitchen, that is because butter was used instead of oil. In reality, Mrs. Emlen’s cookbook offers a wide range of recipes, from rich with butter and cream to very healthy with very little fat added. Today I want to share one of each, one for turnips and the other for beets.

It’s winter now in Philadelphia, time for root vegetables. Potatoes, yams, turnips, and beets fill out my CSA share. Each week I receive a box of 7-9 vegetables, locally grown, harvested in season and  organic. This is an easy way to remind me how Mrs. Emlen and her family would have eaten. There was no refrigeration nor any jets from Chile, bringing up summer fruits and vegetables. The winter diet of fresh vegetables would have been very limited. At the moment I am looking for turnip recipes to break up the monotony. Time to try Mrs. Emlen’s turnip recipe on pg. 48. I would not have noticed or remembered this one except that it is the second recipe for turnips, next to the first recipe in the book is a note:  a better at 48th page.

Turnips

Pare & cut them in thin slices, put them into water that is boiling hard, boil fast for 1/2 an hour or a little more, press out every drop of water through a colander mashing them perfectly smooth. To 1/2 peck, which makes a large dish, Take 3 jills of milk, boil it, stir into the milk 1/4lb. of butter, which has been mixed with 2 teaspoons of flour, a teaspoonful white sugar some pepper & salt let this cook a little. Put the turnips into this sauce, & stew 1/4 of an hour __ They are excellent. Mrs. Camac

  • 1lb. Turnips
  • 1 1/2c milk
  • 1/2c butter at room temp.
  • 2 t flour
  • 1 t white sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Slice the turnips very thin and boil until cooked. They are very watery so it is a good idea to follow the recommendations and press out as much water through a dense colander or sieve before mashing them. In a small bowl, mix the butter, flour, sugar, salt and pepper together until smooth. Put the milk into a pot that will also accommodate the amount of mashed turnips you have. Bring the milk to just under boiling. With a whisk, stir in the butter mixture. This will take a few minutes before the butter melts. After the butter has melted completely and you see the sauce thicken, turn the heat to low and mix in the mashed turnips. Adjust salt and pepper as needed. I have to agree with Mrs. Emlen – these are excellent!

This recipe does validate the comment - everything was so rich back then! Yes, the milk would have been whole milk, possibly still with the cream mixed in, plus 1/2c of butter? That is a very rich dish. But it is possible to make this dish with 1% or even non-fat milk and it will still be creamy. If you’ve never made sauce like this before – it takes a bit of practice, but once you’ve got it, it will work for any sauce, including gravy.

  • 1lb turnips
  • 2c 1% milk
  • 2T flour (yes tablespoons here)
  • 1t sugar – this smooths out the flavor of the turnips
  • salt and pepper

Boil and mash turnips as above. In a large pot, bring 1 1/2c milk, sugar, salt and pepper to just under boiling. Have ready the extra 1/2c milk with 2T flour mixed in. The best way to do this I’ve found is to put the flour into a jam jar with a lid and add the milk. Screw the lid on tightly and shake vigorously. You want all of the flour suspended in the milk. When you see that the milk in the pot is ready, give your jam jar one more shake, remove the lid and start stirring the milk in the pot at a medium speed. As you continue stirring, slowly pour the milk/flour mixture in. Keep stirring after you’ve poured it all in. Watch the sauce while you stir and in about a minute or two the sauce will instantly become thicker. Stir for another minute, turn the heat to low and add the turnips. Cook for another 5 minutes.

To dispel the myth of only rich food, I offer my other favorite root vegetable dish from Mrs. Emlen; beets. This week in my CSA share I got blond beets, aren’t they beautiful? They taste exactly the same as the red ones but are bright orangey-yellow.

Beets

Put young beets into boiling water, with a handful of salt, & keep them boiling hard, for an hour, then dip them in cold water, the skin will pull off whole cut them in quarters, put to them a large piece of butter a teaspoonful of vinegar, a little black pepper & salt. Be particular not to cut tops & tails. E.B.C [Mrs. Camac]

  • 1 – 2lbs beets
  • 1/4c salt
  • 1-2tsp butter
  • 1tsp white vinegar
  • salt and pepper to taste.

Boil the beets for 30-40 minutes depending on what they need (and I would cut tops and tails). They are done when you put a fork in and they are mostly soft with a little resistance. Dip each beet into cold water separately and gently pull on the skin – it will slip right off. Quarter the beats and put them in a bowl, add the butter while they are still hot so that it melts. Add the vinegar and flavor with salt and pepper. Toss to coat everything. If you want a completely non-fat dish, leave out the butter, but really, you aren’t adding that much so it’s okay. The vinegar is what makes the flavor amazing.

For more delicious recipes for 1865, check out the facsimile of Mrs. Emlen’s cookbook available in HSP’s online shop here.

This will be my last foodie blog post for the season. I hope you've enjoyed reading and have tried some of the recipes for yourselves. I wish you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

2/27/13
Author: Cary Hutto

Welcome to the second installment of transcripts from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). In the event that you're just joining in, or have perhaps forgotten what this is about, HSP recently acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War, 1863-1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Comments: 2

2/20/13
Author: Rachel Moloshok

I'm posting this entry on behalf of my intern, Ethan Fried, who performed extensive amounts of research and writing for the Preserving American Freedom digital history project, funded by Bank of America. For this project, Ethan described and annotated 50 documents that help trace the evolution of American liberties and composed biographies of related people and organizations. Ethan is a recent graduate of Pennsylvania State University and holds degrees in History and Secondary Education.

Comments: 0

2/13/13
Author: Tara O'Brien

In November the Conservation Department at HSP started its latest grant project; conserving the Bank of North America Collection.Generously funded by Wells Fargo, this project will focus on repairing approximately 650 volumes, 400 graphics, and several boxes of loose manuscripts. Over the next three years conservation staff will be reparing and stabilizing ledgers, minute books, account books, stock certificates, and currency of the first bank in the United States. The collection is also being processed and we look forward to a new finding aid to help research within the collection.

Comments: 2

2/6/13
Author: Rachel Moloshok

I joined the Historical Society of Pennsylvania as an intern in September 2012 to work on the Preserving American Freedom project. The project aims to transcribe, digitize, and annotate fifty notable documents from HSP’s collections and turn them into an online exhibit. In my short time here, I have researched and written about more than twenty of these items along with Ethan Fried, another intern. At this point in the project, we are finished with annotations and descriptions of every document, as well as most of the biographies of people and organizations who appear in the documents.

Comments: 0

1/30/13
Author: Samantha Spott

With over 1,000 photographs, there was a wealth of topics that interested me as I digitized the Leonard Covello collection over the course of my internship. Leonard Covello (1887-1982) was an Italian immigrant who established and served as principal of the Benjamin Franklin High School in New York City. He is well known for his community centered school philosophy and his activism among the East Harlem neighborhood, especially with Italian and Puerto Rican immigrant groups.

Comments: 5

1/23/13
Author: Cary Hutto

If you've been keeping up with recent HSP news, you've probably seen a press release documenting records of the Parry family that we recently acquired.  These two wonderful collections, one the George F. Parry family volumes (Collection 3694) and the other of Susan Parry volumes (Collection 3695), contain interesting and in-depths glimpses into the history of medicine and veterinarian medicine in Pennsylvania during the 1800s.

Comments: 0

1/16/13
Author: Rachel Moloshok

January 1, 2013, marked the 150th Anniversary of Lincoln's final Emancipation Proclamation, and a special issue of the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, of which I am proud to be the Assistant Editor, commemorates this transformative moment in American history. Yet it is not just because I've spent the last few months editing the latest scholarship on emancipation that freedom has been on my mind.

Comments: 0

1/9/13
Author: Hillary Kativa

This Saturday, January 12th, a new Miss America will be crowned amidst the glitz and glamour of the Las Vegas strip, a far cry from the pageant's humble origins on the Atlantic City boardwalk.  Thankfully, for those who yearn for the days when bathing beauties roamed the Jersey shore, you can travel back in time with these historic images recently added to HSP's Digital Library

Comments: 0

12/26/12
Author: Cary Hutto

Philadelphia has a long and storied history in the printing and publishing worlds.  Here was founded one of the nation's earliest papers mills as well as its first prominent newspaper, the Pennsylvania Gazette.  Ranking high among America's early publishers was Mathew Carey (1760-1839).

Comments: 3

12/10/12
Author: Tara O'Brien

When I tell people I love to cook from cookbooks that are 150 to 200 years old, I am always surprised by those who cringe. The first question is always, “Eew – how could it be any good?” Second question, with a look of disgust on the face is, “What did they eat back then?” Answer: same as we do! People have always loved good food. The other reaction is that everyone thinks the food was so rich; cream and butter everywhere. While it is true, Mrs. Emlen does use a lot of butter in her kitchen, that is because butter was used instead of oil. In reality, Mrs.

Comments: 1