Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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10/8/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

Add the highway to Pennsylvania's contributions to American history. The Pennsylvania Turnpike, America's first four-lane limited-access highway, celebrates its 75th anniversary this week.

The push for intercity roads in Pennsylvania is as old as the commonwealth itself.

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9/30/15
Author: Cary Hutto

Welcome back, dear readers, for more transcriptions from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

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9/29/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

Before Pope Francis celebrates Mass on the Parkway on Sunday, guests may want to consider visiting some Philadelphia churches that acted as both spiritual and social lodestars for their communities.

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9/22/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As the papal visit looms and Philadelphia inspects its Catholic past, consider the life of John Nepomucene Neumann, the fourth bishop of Philadelphia and the first canonized American male.

Born in Prachatitz, Bohemia (present-day Czech Republic), in 1811, Neumann studied for the priesthood in Prague and looked forward to ordination. A gluttony of priests in Europe stalled his ambitions - there were simply no positions open. After writing to bishops across the continent, Neumann broadened his correspondence campaign to the New World.

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9/14/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

The gallery of 2016 presidential hopefuls has swollen to 22 - not counting the possible late entry of Vice President Biden. Have American primary and caucus voters ever faced such a bewildering choice?

For some perspective, join Joseph Keppler for "An Unpleasant Ride Through the Presidential 'Haunted Forest.' " Originally published in the humor magazine Puck, Keppler's chromolithograph depicts Uncle Sam and Columbia coursing through an eerie wood en route to the 1884 presidential election.

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9/8/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

Maritime disaster and lawn tennis have more in common than one might suppose. Consider the quiet confidence of Richard Norris Williams, Titanic survivor and tennis titlist.

A descendant of Benjamin Franklin, Williams was born to American parents in Switzerland. Acceptance to Harvard in 1912 readied the 21-year-old for his first trip to the United States. With first-class passage booked on the RMS Titanic, Williams and his father boarded in Cherbourg.

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9/8/15
Author: Charissa Schulze

In the age of e-readers and mass paperbacks, it is easy to forget that books were once a very scarce and expensive commodity made by hand from materials equally costly and difficult to acquire.  In the distant past, before the prevalence of paper, book pages were most often cut from vellum, a parchment made from calfskin; depending on the size of the book and number of pages, a single volume could require the laboriously prepared skins of several, even dozens, of animals.  It was therefore not unheard of for such pages and books to be scraped down and reused, t

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9/1/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As anyone with a hangover on April 15 knows, taxes and whiskey have never mixed. George Washington learned this lesson the hard way when facing off against the largest organized resistance to federal authority between the Revolution and the Civil War: the Whiskey Rebellion.

In the years after Yankee victory at Yorktown, the nascent United States became shackled to a foe far more tyrannical than a British monarch: budgetary imbalance.

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8/26/15
Author: Cary Hutto

Hello all! We're closing in on the final months of posts of transcribed entries from the George F. Parry Civil War diaries (George F. Parry family volumes, Collection 3694). If you're just joining us, in 2012 HSP acquired the diaries of Bucks County resident and Civil War veterinary surgeon George F. Parry. In that collection are three diaries he kept during the Civil War dating from 1863 to 1865, when he served with the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

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8/24/15
Author: Vincent Fraley

As students and parents prepare for the coming school year, consider the half-century career of educator Mary Anna Longstreth.

Born in Philadelphia, Longstreth (1811-1884) began her schooling at 2 years old, "according to the strictest traditions of the Society of Friends," as recorded by the Mary Anna Longstreth Alumnae Association. At 13, Longstreth was already instructing her younger sisters in Latin.

"Her early training made work the habit of her life," recounted a future colleague.

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