Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is a joint blog of HSP's archives, conservation, and digitization departments.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well as how we care for, describe, and preserve our collections.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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4/4/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Women account for more than a third of physicians in the United States. This was not always the diagnosis. Consider the story of one of the first American female doctors: Bucks County resident Susan Parry.

Before the Civil War, the quality of medical education and practice varied across the country. Sham schools opened on the Western frontier and awarded degrees as quickly as they could be printed, while a handful of cities – including Philadelphia – boasted long traditions of rigor and innovation. Most medical schools shared the same admission standard, however: men only.

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3/27/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

 

 

 

Numerous organizations and individuals supported the Underground Railroad. The daring escape of Henry "Box" Brown relied on the help of an unlikely ally: the mail.

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3/20/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

 

 

 

 

The scale of the Civil War's carnage required radical changes to the United States' medical infrastructure.

In antebellum America, it was not to hospitals that infirm individuals would often turn. Hospitals, as modernly conceived, were rare and primarily for the indigent and insane. The horrid battles following the outbreak of the war, however, convinced Army administrators that this loose network was inadequate for battlefield casualties measured in the tens of thousands.

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3/17/16
Author: Cary Hutto

If you didn't know it already, HSP has a growing collection of books on historic cooking and the culinary arts! Here's a rundown of some books that were recently added to the library's collection. Click on the links for more information on each title from our online catalog Discover.

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3/16/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

The first in a series, the following article was written by HSP Digital Services Intern Mark Carnesi and is being posted on his behalf. Stay tuned in the coming weeks as Mark continues his look at the George A. Foreman scrapbook collection. 

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3/14/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Made manifest by its abundant non-profits, Philadelphia boasts a storied tradition of volunteerism. This spirit of civic concern and community solidarity was responsible for many of the city's first hospitals, schools, and, in the case of the Children’s Aid Society of Pennsylvania (CAS), one of the first organizations in the U.S. dedicated to the care of youngsters.

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3/7/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

As the Philadelphia Orchestra tunes up for this week's performances of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 8, consider the story of the man who introduced the orchestra to the world: Leopold Stokowski.

Born in London to a Polish carpenter father and an Irish mother, Stokowski (1882-1977) studied at Britain's Royal College of Music and Queen's College, Oxford, before working as an organist and choirmaster.

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2/29/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

 

 

 

 

It will perhaps come as no shock that, in terms of website categories, pornography attracts the most traffic. Number two, however, may surprise some: genealogy.

Popularized by shows such as Who Do You Think You Are? and Finding Your Roots, genealogy - the study of lines of descent - has become one of the most prevalent pastimes in the United States.

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2/21/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

Often thought of as the last bastions of hush, libraries are louder than one might have heard. So tune in and listen closely to Philadelphia's 300-plus-year musical legacy.

Forsaking it in their religious services and sneering at it in their private lives, the Quaker founders of Philadelphia were a decidedly unmusical bunch. Fortunately for future ears, other religious and ethnic groups were counted among the city's early settlers, many with active musical traditions - and instruments - in tow.

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2/16/16
Author: Vincent Fraley

The term Philadelphia Sound conjures for many the lush arrangements and piercing horns of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff tunes from the 1970s. For fans of classical music, however, the silky strings of the Philadelphia Orchestra define the city's namesake sound. Consider the story of the man who did much to perfect it: Eugene Ormandy.

Born Jeno Blau in Budapest, Ormandy (1899-1985) was given a tiny fiddle at age 3. Two years later, he enrolled as a violinist in the Hungarian capital's Royal State Academy of Music before becoming its youngest graduate, at age 14.

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