Past Events

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Past Events

Thursday, 9/21/17
Lecture/Panel Discussion

Warner Mifflin—energetic, uncompromising, and reviled—was the key figure connecting the abolitionist movements before and after the American Revolution. A descendant of one of the pioneering families of William Penn's "Holy Experiment," Mifflin upheld the Quaker pacifist doctrine, carrying the peace testimony to Generals Howe and Washington across the blood-soaked Germantown battlefield and traveling several thousand miles by horse up and down the Atlantic seaboard to stiffen the spines of the beleaguered Quakers, harried and exiled for their neutrality during the war for independence.

Tuesday, 8/8/17
Exhibit/Display

HSP is pleased to announce a brand-new document display for summer: Sports of All Sorts. Take a break from the summer heat (or mild weather) and head to HSP to see what’s on display!

The materials on display covers a range of sports, from cricket (yes, cricket is played in America too!) to baseball, from rowing to cycling.

Wednesday, 6/28/17
Exhibit/Display

“Bring me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses.” The essence of the American dream is rooted in the tales of immigrants. Their stories of overcoming  adversity are profound examples of the American dream: freedom and equal opportunity for all who pursue a better life for themselves and their families.

Tuesday, 6/20/17
Exhibit/Display

James Monroe became the fifth president of the United States in March, 1817. Three months later he embarked on a fifteen-week tour of the northern states, traveling up the east coast from Washington, DC to Portland, Maine; west to Detroit; and back to Washington via Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and Maryland, totaling some 2,000 miles. 

Wednesday, 5/31/17
Workshop

The experience of war is unique to those that lived through it, whether the individual served in uniform or remained on the home-front. One hundred years ago, the First World War represented a departure from previous conflicts; the scale of carnage led many to earnestly believe it to be “the war to end all wars.”

Wednesday, 5/24/17
Lecture/Panel Discussion

This April marks the centennial of American involvement in the First World War, a global conflagration that upended the established world order.

During the conflict, foreign-born soldiers represented nearly 1 out of 5 servicemen in the U.S. Army. This surge of Old World soldiers – from 46 different nations – challenged the culture of the American military, its linguistic and religious traditions, and required top brass to reconsider training methods.

Wednesday, 5/10/17

From the 1960s to the present, two-thirds of Pennsylvania’s population growth has been the result of Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans, and others moving to the Commonwealth.

In the 1960s, the vast majority of Latin@s lived in Philadelphia; today, as many live in the Pennsylvania Dutch region as in the City of Brotherly Love.

This is the most significant regional demographic change in more than a century, and it is one that is poorly understood by scholars and the public.

Saturday, 5/6/17
Lecture/Panel Discussion

Join Taller Puertorriqueño and author Dr. Victor Vazquez-Hernandez on May 6 as they present Before the Wave: Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia, 1910-1945. The program explores the social history of the genesis of the Puerto Rican community in Philadelphia with a special emphasis on the interwar years (1919-1941). Dr. Vazquez-Hernandez connects the community’s origins to the mass migration of the post-WW II years when Puerto Ricans consolidated their presence in Philadelphia (1945-1985).

Tuesday, 4/18/17
Lecture/Panel Discussion

This joint Historical Society of Pennsylvania/Philadelphia Orchestra program, entitled Rachmaninoff’s Philadelphia, is being presented in conjunction with the Philadelphia Orchestra’s April 2017 Rachmaninoff Festival. The program will explore the special relationship between the Philadelphia Orchestra and the great Russian composer/conductor/pianist Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1843).

Tuesday, 4/11/17
Exhibit/Display

Between 1914 and 1918, much of the world squandered life and industry in a 500-mile trench gouged from Belgium’s North Sea coast to the Franco-Swiss border. The visual record of this conflict ranges widely, from patriotic propaganda to aerial photographs.

Saturday, 4/8/17
Special Event

On April 8th, the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) will host Where We Belong: Artists in the Archive, a day-long symposium bringing together artists, activists, academics, and archivists to explore ways to challenge the systematic erasure of stories of marginalized communities in America.

The symposium will be held at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and will premiere works from five artists - musicians, visual artists, and dancers - who have engaged SAADA’s archives to find inspiration from overlooked histories of South Asians in the US.

Tuesday, 3/28/17
Lecture/Panel Discussion

During this year's Women's History Month, celebrate the Ralston Center’s 200th anniversary with a free workshop on Tuesday, March 28 at 6:00 p.m.

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