Fondly, Pennsylvania

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Fondly, Pennsylvania

Fondly, Pennsylvania is HSP's main blog.  Here you will find posts on our latest projects and newest discoveries, as well articles on interesting bits of local history reflected in our collection.  Whether you are doing research or just curious to know more about the behind-the-scenes work that goes on at HSP, please read, explore, and join the conversation!

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8/18/20
Author Chris Damiani

This blog post is written by Emma Weil, Programs and Services Co-op from Drexel University

August 18th, 1920 is when the 19th amendment was ratified, granting all women who were United States citizens the right to vote. The amendment was passed on June 4th, and was officially ratified after Tennessee ratified it on the 18th

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7/14/20
Author Chris Damiani

From Made By Us, a history and civics organization partnered with historical institutions across the country, My Wish for U.S. allows people to tell their wishes for the country in an effort to unite communites and inspire individuals. A few scrolls through their explore page, and one will find wishes of anti-bigotry, improved government systems, and fair democracy. My Wish for U.S. also allows users to contact local representitives with their wishes, giving users an easy first step into action.

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10/8/19

The blog was written by Emily Kulpa, a summer intern from Rutgers University.

Despite being decades apart, the tuberculosis outbreak in the early 1900s and the AIDS crisis in the 80s-90s share a striking similarity, namely with how people responded to them. Both outbreaks were defined by a large response from the public, but also by the fact that they were ignored by state and local governments. One can celebrate the work that was done for these epidemics while also recognizing that more could have been done if not for public biases or political corruption.

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10/8/19

This blog was written by Fiona Bruckman, a summer intern from Vassar College.

 

Throughout the history of the United States, national attitudes toward immigration and the resulting legislation have opened and subsequently closed the doors for those wishing to settle here. The country’s reception of immigrants has been influenced by global politics, population concerns, and—under the guise of defending public health—fear of epidemic.

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9/25/19
Author Cary Hutto

The following article was written by HSP volunteer Randi

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8/28/19
Author
Summer in Philadelphia was once associated with a deadly calamity: the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793, which left nearly 5,000 dead and thousands of others fearful for their lives.
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8/26/19
Author
Despite William Penn’s vision for a "greene country towne," Philadelphia's public parks have not always been accessible to all.
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8/20/19
Author
In partnership with Warrior Writers, HSP is hosting The Art of Reintegration: Veterans and the Silences of War, an ongoing discussion series designed to empower veterans to share their life experiences in their own words.
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7/18/19
Founded in New York City in 1892 and federated as a national organization in 1900, the Workmen’s Circle (also known as Der Arbeiter Ring) is a Jewish fraternal organization active across North America. It was established by Yiddish-speaking immigrants from the Russian Pale of Settlement, many of whom asserted pro-trade union and socialist politics. Over its long history, the Workmen’s Circle has offered a variety of services to its members while advocating for social justice causes.
Topics : Labor, Religion
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7/12/19
Alyson Gamble, a fellow through Drexel’s IMLS-funded program LEADS-4-NDP, is using data visualization to create new connections in HSP's collections.
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